Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Session Overview
Session
252N: Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus
Time:
Friday, 26/Apr/2019:
1:15pm - 2:45pm

Session Chair: Julie Gwendolin Zaehringer
Session Chair: Rachel Ann Carmenta
Session Chair: Judith Schleicher
Location: MB-220
Main Building, room 220, second floor, west wing, 154 (+22) seats
Session Topics:
What do people want from land?

Session Abstract

Landscape transformations at the forest-agricultural nexus in the Global South are a major element of global environmental change. Numerous environment-related interventions have been implemented to influence such change trajectories towards more sustainable outcomes. These include strict conservation and agricultural intensification interventions representing two extremes of land sparing. Various interventions fall in-between these extremes, coupling agricultural investments with measures for forest protection and potentially representing forms of land sharing. While strict conservation strategies have been criticised for failing to incorporate human needs, agricultural intensification interventions have also raised concerns, including over their negative environmental impacts. Thus, coupled strategies that combine increased agricultural returns, with mechanisms for forest protection, have been proposed as preferable options. Yet, win-win outcomes are far from certain. Further, particular dimensions, such as non-material flows from nature to people (including relational values and place-based attachments to the land, locally defined priorities for human well-being or distinct impacts for particular user groups), are often under-explored in conventional impact evaluation approaches. This lack of focus highlights that discussions are needed (1) on the diverse impacts of distinct types of interventions across scales (from national to local), (2) on how they are being evaluated, and (3) about the politics of who decides what to measure. This interactive session will explore these three themes and present cases where the impact of environment-related interventions has been documented, with a particular focus on human wellbeing. The panel and discussion will centre on the forested tropics of the Global South and use interactive presentations that draw on synthesis and empirical research.

The session will comprise two parts, a panel followed by an interactive discussion session that involves the audience. The panel will comprise five speakers, who will give short presentations (five min) on complementary topics, drawing on novel communication approaches that integrate video, audio, and photography. The panel will then take questions from the audience, followed by group discussions. Participants can join one of three groups, each discussing for 25 min one of the three session themes. Each group will feedback their main discussion points to the whole group. The session will end with an overall discussion and panel member responses to key points raised by the three discussion groups.


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Presentations
ID: 253 / 252N: 1
252N Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus (INVITED ABSTRACTS ONLY)

Connection with nature and values shape pro-conservation attitudes towards nature among Amazonian farmers

Katarzyna Mikolajczak1, Jos Barlow1, Alexander Lees2, Luke Parry1

1Lancaster University, United Kingdom; 2Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom

Rooted in the conventional wisdom that the poor don’t care for nature beyond its utilitarian value, conservation has traditionally relied primarily on the ‘carrot and stick’ approaches of legal restrictions and economic incentives to motivate protection of nature. We tested the relationship between Connection With Nature (CWN) – the sense of belonging and emotional attachment to nature – and conservation attitudes of non-indigenous farmers in South-eastern Brazilian Amazon. Contradicting market-based assumptions, pro-conservation views were widespread and shaped primarily by affective CWN and individual values, indicating that intrinsic motivations may be an important driver of concern for nature in the rural tropics.



ID: 315 / 252N: 2
252N Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus (INVITED ABSTRACTS ONLY)

Land use and human well-being changes in the context of conservation and cash crop booms: case studies from Madagascar

Jorge C. Llopis1,2

1Centre for Development and Environment, Switzerland; 2Institute of Geography, University of Bern, Switzerland

This presentation will provide insights from three protected areas in Madagascar with different degrees of success in halting deforestation while sustaining human well-being. These examples will trigger discussion about how land use and well-being dynamics might interact in the forest-agriculture interface in the Global South. Key inputs to the session will include insights on the unexpected effects that protected areas implementation might have on on-going deforestation dynamics, on the problematic role played by cash crop booms in the forest frontier, and on the neglected impact of extreme weather events on the well-being of populations which in turn drive landscape change.



ID: 382 / 252N: 3
252N Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus (INVITED ABSTRACTS ONLY)

Social-ecological outcomes of agricultural intensification

Laura Vang Rasmussen

University of British Columbia, Canada

Sustainable intensification of agriculture is seen by many in science and policy as a flagship strategy to simultaneously feed humanity and use ecosystems sustainably. However, the conditions that support positive social-ecological outcomes remain poorly documented. We address this knowledge gap by synthesizing research that analyses how agricultural intensification influences both ecosystem services and human well-being in low- and middle-income countries. Our results show that agricultural intensification is rarely found to lead to simultaneous positive ecosystem service and well-being outcomes. This is particularly the case when ecosystem services other than food provisioning are taken into consideration.



ID: 289 / 252N: 4
252N Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus (INVITED ABSTRACTS ONLY)

What types of integrated landscape initiatives improve food production, conserve forests and improve livelihoods?: an empirical analysis from Latin America

Rachel Ann Carmenta

University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Tropical forests are a site of dramatic land use change, primarily driven by agricultural expansion. Competing demands for land in forest frontiers must be reconciled to achieve equitable and sustainable futures. Identifying the strategies that will deliver to the multiple imperatives of food production, forest conservation and improved livelihoods is a contemporary sustainability challenge. Integrated landscape initiatives (ILIs) are a plausible strategy for achieving desired outcomes across multiple sectors, yet are diverse and involve bundles of actions. We identify a typology of ILIs, assess their agricultural, conservation and livelihood outcomes, and identify factors associated with their performance.



ID: 553 / 252N: 5
252N Measuring diverse impacts of agriculture and conservation interventions in tropical forest landscapes: bringing human wellbeing into focus (INVITED ABSTRACTS ONLY)

Who measures and what counts: thinking about capturing human wellbeing across scales

Judith Schleicher1, Rachel Carmenta1, Julie Zaehringer1,2

1Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; 2Centre for Development and Environment, University of Bern, Switzerland

The importance of measuring the diverse impacts of agricultural and conservation interventions has repeatedly been highlighted. While there have been numerous calls for increasing the use of impact evaluation, less attention has been paid to what outcome measures are put forward. This is despite the fact that such measures are decisive regarding what interventions are considered successes or failures. This talk will focus on key development and conservation paradigms, highlighting the narrow scope of current outcome measures and the voices that are being included. In particular, we show that there is little focus on capturing environment-wellbeing relationships holistically across scales.



 
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