Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the Central European time zone. The current conference time is: 6th Dec 2022, 09:40:49pm CET

 
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Session Overview
Date: Friday, 24/Sept/2021
12:30pm - 12:35pmd01: Welcome
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, SUAD/NUA
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

Lusheng Pan, SUAD President & DRS LxD.2021 General Conference Chair

Liv Merete Nielsen, Chair of the DRS LxD.2021 International Academic Organising Committee 

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

12:40pm - 12:50pmo01: Orientation
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

12:50pm - 1:30pmp01: Plenary Session
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Liv Merete Nielsen, OsloMet
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 

Editorial: Design Learning Environments

Katja Thoring1, Nicole Lotz2, Linda Keane3

1Anhalt University, Germany; 2The Open University, UK; 3The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, USA

The track on "Design Learning Environments" has explored the question of how the physical and digital spatial environments of educational institutions can be designed in order to better facilitate learning.



Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving From Kindergarten to Higher Education

Úrsula Bravo1, Catalina Cortés1, Jeannette LaFors2, Andrés Téllez3, Natalia Allende4

1Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile; 2Kelefors Consulting, USA; 3Appalachian State University, USA; 4Design for Change, Chile

As educators increasingly adopt design-based methods outside of design disciplines, we wondered about the impact of incorporating these approaches on students and teachers’ educative experiences. This track includes eleven articles that explore how children, youth, and teachers in schools and universities have taken up design thinking and other design-based models. The track also offers two design-based teaching models presented as workshops. In the following text, we present arguments that justify the incorporation of design in general education –both at the school and university level–, synthesize some empirical evidence from the scientific literature, present the contributions gathered in our track, and offer some questions to guide future research.



Empowering Critical Design Literacy

Eva Lutnæs

Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

In track 02, we invited design researchers and educators to explore, and crack open critical design literacy as a subset of design literacy. At the core of critical design literacy, we suggested the ability to connect to real-world dilemmas with empathy, reject destructive products of human creativity and focus on problems that are worth solving. The main concern of the track is the exploration of current educational practices, academic discourses and implications of design education empowering for critical design literacy at a specific level of education or across levels (kindergarten to PhD).



Introduction: Collaboration in Design Education Theoretical and Methodological Frameworks for Learning Through and From Partnerships

Naz A G Z Börekçi, Fatma Korkut, Gülay Hasdoğan

Middle East Technical University

We made the call for this track with the hope of exploring the benefits and challenges of collaboration in design education, through theoretical and methodological frameworks displaying how various stages of the collaboration are managed, communication between partners is maintained and commitment of parties to design education is sustained. Collaboration carried out in design education, brings with it opportunities and challenges for all parties involved, namely, the university, the students and the partners. Partnerships and collaboration in projects is a significant part of design education, feeding the academy with experiences incorporating different approaches, knowledge and tools, and enriching the overall outcomes. Such collaboration provides insights to the academy on the expectations of various partners from the professionals of design, affecting in return how the professionals-to-be are equipped in design education with the knowledge and skills related to their field.



Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge

Bryan F. Howell1, Jan Willem Hoftijzer2, Mauricio Novoa Munoz3, Mark Sypesteyn2, Rik de Reuver4

1Brigham Young University, United States of America; 2Technical University of Delft; 3Western Sydney University; 4MODYN Design Agency

Design sketching and drawing (education and knowledge) are inherently visual and multimodal (cognitive coding) and rapidly evolving in contemporary culture. Today, sketching and drawing research in design education is primed for reinterpretation and new contextualisation. Discussions about analogue and digital sketching, live and online education, traditional and emerging visual domain contexts, generative and explanatory visual knowledge, and emerging technology tools and methods have seeded the ground to reassess our relationships with the role and values of sketching, drawing education, and visual knowledge in general. This track includes three articles and two workshops that explore these emerging trends. The first article is a visual paper (a non-written academic output) and explores the power of sketchnoting and visual knowledge as taught to first-year design students. The second paper is a case study examining how a hand-drawing course was successfully converted to a hybrid digital/analogue, live/online course during the COVID pandemic. The third paper explores the experiential reading differences between and visual (sketched) and verbal (written) research articles. Our first workshop explores how emerging virtual reality (VR) technologies are changing traditional design workflows. Workshop participants will ideate, sketch, simulate, and produce a 3D-printed artefact. Our second workshop will utilise Miro, an emerging robust visual-based tool that helps users organise their content wholistically. Participants will visualise a research project and enable collaboration opportunities using the tool. Sketching, drawing, and visual knowledge are rapidly evolving, and the contributions from this track should expose design educators to current thoughts and activities that demonstrate these changes.

 
1:30pm - 1:35pmo02: Orientation
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

1:35pm - 2:00pmChinese Zodiac 01: Introduction of Chinese Zodiac Designs
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Peiyuan Zhang, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

It's interesting that the traditional China has 12 Chinese zodiacs,namely rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, Chinese dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. Those animal signs are a 12-year cycle used for dating the years. They represent a cyclical concept of time, rather than the linear concept of time. The Chinese lunar calendar is based on the cycles of the moon, and is constructed in a different fashion than the solar calendar. Every year is assigned an animal sign according to a repeating cycle from Rat to Pig.

Interpreter: Hong LIANG

1:35pm - 2:00pmDesign Education in China 01: Professor Sun Lei will introduce how the design education is arranged at SUAD and in China, Q&A
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Lei Sun, Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

Meet with scholars from the Design Programmes in China to find out how is Design Education organised in Chinese Universities

Interpreters: Shan GAO and Xingfu WANG

1:35pm - 2:00pmExercise 01: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participants will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG

1:35pm - 2:00pmMuseum 01: SUAD collection show
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Yuan Tian, Shandong University of Art & Design

SUAD museum is composed of Sun Changlin Art Museum and Oriental Chinese Crafts Museum. Its collection consists of ancient and modern ceramics and stone Buddha statues, traditional folk life utensils, toys, Chinese New Year pictures, embroideries etc.

1:35pm - 2:00pmTea Ceremony: Demonstration by the Tea Master Ms.Yumei Yang
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Li Jie, Shandong University of Art&Design
Session Chair: Xingfu Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Arild Berg, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University

The Chinese people, in their drinking of tea, place much significance on the act of "savoring." "Savoring tea" is not only a way to discern good tea from mediocre tea, but also how people take delight in their reverie and in tea-drinking itself. Snatching a bit of leisure from a busy schedule, making a kettle of strong tea, securing a serene space, and serving and drinking tea by yourself can help banish fatigue and frustration, improve your thinking ability and inspire you with enthusiasm. You may also imbibe it slowly in small sips to appreciate the subtle allure of tea-drinking, until your spirits soar up and up into a sublime aesthetic realm. Buildings, gardens, ornaments and tea sets are the elements that form the ambience for savoring tea.

A tranquil, refreshing, comfortable and neat locale is certainly desirable for drinking tea. Chinese gardens are well known in the world and beautiful Chinese landscapes are too numerous to count. Teahouses tucked away in gardens and nestled beside the natural beauty of mountains and rivers are enchanting places of repose for people to rest and recreate themselves.

Interpreter: Xingfu WANG

2:00pm - 3:00pm01/1: Track | Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Jeannette LaFors, Kelefors Consulting
Session Chair: Catalina Cortes, Universidad del Desarrollo
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

select the session's title to access the submissions’ abstracts and files

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

End Users in Students’ Participatory Design Process

Noora Bosch, Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen, Tellervo Härkki

University of Helsinki, Finland

This exploratory case study aims to shed light on how end users were considered in students’ design discussions and final design products. A 3-month participatory design project for students (ages 14–15) was designed, with the design brief: “co-design and make an e-textile product for the preschoolers according to their wishes and needs”. We analyzed transcribed end-users-related design discussions and the final products of two teams. The findings indicate that students’ end-users-related design discussions concerned various functional, technical, and visual/aesthetic features, as well as aspects beyond functional, such as students’ memories and experiences. Additionally, many concrete and abstract features and solutions of the final products were traced back to end users. This study suggests new possibilities for engaging students in empathic and reflective (digital) design and making, targeting design-literate citizens in the 21st century.



2:20pm - 2:40pm

Integrating Design Thinking into STEAM Education: The Design of STEAM Education Platform and Course Based on Creativity Elements

Xuejiao Yin1, Shumeng Hou1, Qingxuan Chen2

1Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, China; 2The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen

The fast development of artificial intelligence in modern society facilitates the needs of creative education. Design thinking,a innovative thinking frame,is benefit to cultivate children’s creativity. However ,little research has clearly explain how to use design thinking to improve creativi-ty.Therefore,this study aimed at integrating creativity and design thinking into STEAM education (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics), and thereby cultivate students’ prob-lem solving and creative ability. Firstly, 151 school-age children participated in the study and fin-ished the creativity tests. Second, dimensions of creativity (e.g., adventure, curiosity, and flexibility) that were significantly related to academic performance were abstracted as core design elements of the education platform. Third, the STEAM education platform model and curriculum design model were established based on the core design elements abstracted and design thinking.These models contribute to scientific ways of designing a STEAM education curriculum and platform aim-ing at improving school-age children’s ability of creativity. With the STEAM education platform, students’ practical and problem-solving ability were expected to be improved.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

Inclusive education driven by design: The case of a graduate seminar course

Úrsula Bravo, Maritza Rivera

Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile

This case study explores the use of design tools by educators with an aim to answer the question: How can a design-based approach contribute to the development of strategies for inclusive education? Thirty-five educators, who were students from the final year of a master’s degree focusing on inclusive education taught at a Chilean university, participated in the study. The information collected included participant observation and the analysis of the work elaborated by the educators throughout the seminar. Subsequently, we selected the trajectories of three participants, which were analysed by open coding. The results suggest that adopting a design-based focus helped the educators understand pedagogical problems as systems of relationships, frame problems constructively, think visually about possible teaching strategies and develop didactic materials to respond to the special educational needs of their students. These findings are important in the light of inclusive education policies that seek to ensure the regular education system provides learning opportunities for all students, regardless of their physical or intellectual characteristics.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm02/1: Empowering Critical Design Literacy
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Siri Homlong, Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design
Session Chair: Karen Braenne, Volda University College

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Experiencing Sustainable Fashion: Have Fun and Feel Clever. A Case Study for Critical Design Literacy

Hanna Hofverberg1, Ninitha Maivorsdotter2

1Malmö University, Sweden; 2Högskolan i Skövde, Sweden

Clothes consumerism is increasing every year, which is a huge challenge for sustainability. Educa-tional Design research have shown that the challenge cannot be solved unless we have critical literate consumers. By making the question of sustainable clothing a matter for critical design lit-eracy, the aim of this case study is to examine the meaning making of an educational material produced for teachers in design and craft education. The educational material, entitled Sustaina-ble Fashion, consists of 17 design projects and the analysis is made with the aid of practical epis-temological analysis with a specific focus on aesthetic experience. Two ways of becoming a sus-tainable consumer of fashion have been identified – to have fun and to feel clever – and these two meaning making activities incorporate certain actions of what it means to be a sustainable consumer. From a critical design literacy perspective, these ways of becoming a sustainable con-sumer are crucial to acknowledge, as they include (and exclude other) specific sustainability ac-tions.



Framing students’ reflective interactions based on photos

Marije ten Brink1,2, Frank M. Nack3, Ben A. M. Schouten1,2

1Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands; 2Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands; 3University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Critical reflection, addressing students’ attitude, beliefs and values related to pressing topics in the world, plays a crucial role in developing ethical sensitiveness and critical design literacy in design education. Critical reflection is provoked by discussing self-made photos, as is demonstrated in the research method Photovoice. This paper considers Photovoice in design education for its ability to foster learning through self-guided critical reflective interactions with peers based on self-made photos. Research on how to support this is lacking. This paper addresses this gap by studying students engaging in self-guided Photovoice assignments. Results consist of adapted steps for Photovoice in education and illustrate potential as well as boundaries of self-guided Photovoice through students’ quotes and photomaps. Also, five frames of interpretation, suggested by students engaged in self-guided Photovoice, contribute to previous knowledge and may inspire the design education community to start experimenting with Photovoice in course work. The final aim is to support students in critical reflection, a crucial skill for responsible design professionals.



Critical design literacy through reflection in design

Ingvill Gjerdrum Maus

Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

This paper discusses a conceptual review of three frameworks for students’ reflection in general design education. The frameworks were selected for their different focus of attention on the students’ engagement with design products and environmental impacts. The review results indicated that the focus of attention had affected the topics of the questions for reflection; the questions of how related to product design, the questions of why related to environmental impacts and question of what related to plural solutions to challenges in both product design and environments. The paper discuss how researcher, teacher and students have different perspectives on whether these topics for operates within, or aim to transform established fields of practice. This, the frameworks different contributions to enhancement of students’ critical design literacy.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm04/1: Collaboration in Design Education
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Fatma Korkut, Middle East Technical Univ.

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

Towards Radical Synergy for More Just & Equitable Futures

Audrey Bennett, Ron Eglash, Roland Graf, Deepa Butoyila, Keesa Johnson, Jenn Low, Andréia Rocha

University of Michigan, United States of America

Inequity and social injustice are omnipresent wicked problems, complex challenges for which there are no single solutions due to their cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary, and systemic nature. For example, the “green revolution” of the 1970s was supposed to solve world hunger. But we saw instead a rise in corporate control over agriculture (Pielke and Linner, 2019). The design of social media, widely touted as creating a harmonious global village in the 1980s, has instead partly turned into hatching grounds for a global white supremacist movement and other forms of extremism. We cannot afford to passively allow accidental synergies to create global disasters. Instead, we need to bring social, technological, economic, and environmental concerns, among other considerations (the gamut of analysis often abbreviated STEEPV) into a deliberate and reflective emergent process. We refer to this decolonial, emancipatory form of design emergence as “radical synergy.” In this visual paper, we show three projects by graduate students and their partners that take steps toward radical synergy through facilitating community-based, designerly activities that promote generative justice, playful changes of perspectives, and initial-stage integrative analysis



2:20pm - 2:40pm

A format to bridge the transition from university to work. Insights from the Product-Service System Design Tour development.

Andrea Taverna, Daniela De Sainz Molestina

Politecnico di Milano

The last decades have been of significant growth for the Service Design discipline. For supporting students in understanding the multifaceted profile of the Service Designer, academia needs to reflect on how this evolution affects the educational setting as Service Design methods are now applied in different contexts to face complex societal and business challenges. This paper explores how university-industry collaboration in extracurricular activities might support students in understanding the role of the Service Designer in practice. An extracurricular activity in the format of a digital event—the PSSD Tour—addresses this inquiry by involving companies and students in conversations to explore the different applications of Service Design methods in industry projects. After three co-design sessions with stakeholders trigger the development of the PSSD Tour format, three iterative tour tests with companies help experiment and evolve the format.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

Tutors’ Perspectives on NPO Collaboration in Industrial Design Education

Zeynep Yalman-Yıldırım, Gülay Hasdoğan

Middle East Technical University

Non-profit organisation (NPO) collaboration in industrial design education enables tutors to bring real-life problems to the design education context. Only in recent years, good practices of NPO collaboration implemented in the studio and elective courses are seen in industrial design education. Within the scope of this paper, 20 tutors from 10 industrial design departments in Turkey who have carried out educational projects in collaboration with over 30 diverse non-profit partners in their undergraduate courses were interviewed. Based on the thematic analysis, this paper explores design problems studied in collaboration with NPOs in the context of industrial design education together with tutors’ perspectives on the motivations of actors for collaboration, and the benefits and challenges of collaboration. This paper offers three collaboration models on NPO collaborations in education and aims to achieve an extensive and outsider point of view rather than a restrictive, case-specific, insider viewpoint towards these collaborations.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm07/1: Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Bryan Howell, Brigham Young University
Session Chair: Mauricio Novoa Munoz, Western Sydney University
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreter:Shan GAO

 

Exploring the Experiential Reading Differences between Visual and Written Research Papers

Bryan Howell1, Asa Jackson1, Henry Lee2, Julienne DeVita2, Rebekah Rawlings1

1Brigham Young University, United States of America; 2Parsons, The New School, United States of America

Visual or pictorial research papers have emerged in recent years in academic conferences as a non-written archival contribution. Dual Coding Theory teaches us that visual knowledge is distinct from written knowledge and is arguably a universal language (Dreyfuss, 1984), with the ability to communicate complex ideas with clarity, precision, and efficiency (Tufte, 2001). This study explores the reading experience differences between a visual and written research paper containing identical content from design, engineering, and business disciplines. Reading experiences were assessed using a ‘think, feel, and do’ survey, and comprehension was assessed with a quiz. Participants tracked time spent reading and how many times they revisited information. Visual papers provide an improved overall reading experience. Quiz comprehension results were mixed, showing no advantage of one modality over the other. Participants reading visual papers revisited information twice as much as those reading written papers. Designers, engineers, and businesspeople were favourably united in their visual paper reading experience ratings but were not on their written paper ratings.

Keywords: Visual Papers; Pictorial Papers; Non-Written Academic Output; Design Learning; Assessing Reading Experiences



Sketchnoting Experience of First-Year Students

Verena Natalie Paepcke-Hjeltness, Annaka Ketterer, Ella Kannegiesser, Madeline Keough, Tory Meeks, Ayla Schiller

Iowa State University, United States of America

This visual paper follows the sketchnoting experience of a group of first-year honours students as part of a research seminar. The paper shows an overview of sketchnoting, what it is and how to use it, shares examples of lectures and study notes, and visually discusses its benefits and over-all lessons learned and take aways.



Online Comprehensive Teaching on Digital Hand-drawing Taking the course of “Hand-drawn Design Expression” as an example

Ming Zhu

Shandong University of Art and Design, China, People's Republic of

Abstract: Digital hand-drawing techniques have been widely used in the international design field. Under the influence of the Covid-19 epidemic, online education has become an important way of teaching and learning. Based on the online platform, the teacher’s screen sharing combined with digital hand-drawing can not only analyse and demonstrate the principle and process of drawing to the students more intuitively but also tutor and evaluate the course work. In the online teaching design and teaching process of “Hand-drawn Design Expression” course, the application of digital hand-drawing live allows students to learn the course content more directly and visually, and then mix and match with POWERPOINT live lectures and paper hand-drawn live lectures together to form a new mode of online teaching of design education courses.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm08/1: Track | Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University
Session Chair: Linda Nelson Keane, FAIA, NOMA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 

Unlocking wellbeing-affordances in elementary schools initiated by a "natural experiment" caused by Covid-19.

Ruth Stevens, Ann Petermans, Jan Vanrie

Hasselt University, Belgium

In 2020-’21 Covid-19 rolled over the school landscape as a pressure wave. Elementary schools had to push through ad hoc changes in their physical structure to succumb to the safety regulations issued after the first lockdown in the Spring of 2020. These physical alterations influenced the organizational structure of schools and the wellbeing of protagonists. Through all the negative, also positive sparks were noticed, as some changes were appraised positively, inveterate ideas were abandoned for an open minded view and teachers at home overthought their functioning and searched for meaning in their profession. This relevant momentum can be viewed as an opportunity to critically question the rather cumbersome design type of elementary schools, and to provide more attuned spatial affordances to teachers and pupils. The aim of our study was thus twofold: first, to get a grip on the values and needs that teachers and pupils had (re)attached to the functioning, and positively appraised changes in the school organization and environment. Second, we aimed to combine the gathered data and explore design strategies to design wellbeing related affordances inspired by the “natural experiment” caused by Covid-19. To conclude, the paper discusses the ‘flourishing affordance’ in school architecture.



Effects of Certain Selected Stimuli in the Physical School Environment on Learning and Behavior

Anne P. Taylor

School Zone Institute, United States of America

In response to this conference’s call for papers, and after years of giving lectures, writing articles for journals and justification of copious research and development, I have found that a photograph or graphic is worth a thousand words. Hence, I have chosen to write a paper that shows examples of programming and design of prototypical learning environments and to share their effects on learning and behavior quantitively and qualitatively.

The value of this paper goes beyond research and gives readers some ideas to think about in their own work that will inspire and motivate the reader to go beyond where George Vlastos, architect, and I started creating new classrooms as studios and playgrounds as learning landscapes in 1970. We did not use predetermined square feet with predetermined educational specifications for furniture as design determinants, but used as the basis for design, the philosophy of Ecosophy, sustainable Ecoism (Arne Næss) 1 (Næss, 2009). The environments became a system for learning using developmental needs of students in a body, mind and creative spirit continuum as well as curricular concepts where design and design thinking act as a nexus for not only teaching art and design, but basic integrated subject matter areas as well. In this case, architecture of the environment is a silent curriculum but comes alive as students learn to “read it” with its many messages. It leads them to greater love and awareness of the environment and eventually stewardship. Some scholars call it the study of human factors.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm10/1: Track | Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, SUAD/NUA
Session Chair: Xiang Xia, Nanjing University of the Arts

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 

Teaching values in design: a case study about how teachers enable students to go from knowledge to action

Elisabet Nilsson, Anne-Marie Skriver Hansen

Malmö University, Sweden

Design education ought to create conditions for students to develop skills and competencies for working with values in design. Newly educated designers should take responsibility for their actions – become responsible designers that can contribute to a sustainable and sound development of society on all levels: social, economic and environmental. This case study paper provides an example of how teaching activities made available via an online open educational resource, that offers teaching resources for teaching values in design, can be appropriated to a specific educational setting. A selection of teaching activities and how they were implemented in class are described. Results produced by the students were analysed to see in what way the teaching activities enabled the student to go from addressing values in their work, to actually designing with values in mind. The paper ends with a concluding discussion about the potentials of design teachers to become change agents through their pedagogical practices that enable students to go from knowledge to action.



Mash Maker: Improvisation for student studios

Ryan Slone, Bree McMahon

University of Arkansas, United States of America

As design educators, we feel it’s imperative to prepare students for the wicked problems of the 21st century. Design Futures, the briefing papers released by AIGA in 2018, anticipates a complex future where design solutions must be increasingly open-ended to accommodate many layers of uncertainty. In an effort to model such unpredictable constraints, we developed the Mash Maker project, a design charrette that explores the collision of time and form through a system of carefully devised prompts. The conditions encouraged first-year design students to utilize improvisation methods, iteration, and collaboration while underscoring the value of process over outcome. Music provided a logical framework for exploring this relationship, precisely, hip-hop, which uses time-based characteristics for structuring sound (Caswell). In many ways, a beat mimics "the grid," a principle of design. Students designed songs in real-time using specific visual and typographic prompts. By designing and listening in tandem, students connected the auditory to the visual in a pro-process experience that often led to uncertain territory.



Transformative teaching practice through a design thinking approach in social settings: A Reflection on the delivery of a design research methods module in a graphic design programme at undergraduate level

Janey Deng Klingelfuss1, Markus Klingelfuss2

1University of Chester, United Kingdom; 2The Manchester College (Novus Education), United Kingdom

An acknowledgement of the transformative nature of education; one in which design educators are seen as active agents of change, is not new. However, acknowledging the importance of such a phenomenon is fundamental to exploring academic practice in design education. In relation to social contexts and transformations, meeting stakeholders’ needs is increasingly significant to how universities set out graduate options and outcomes for students. Higher education is expected to play a key role in developing the multiple skills and capacities of design and creative subject students for future work in the creative and cultural industries (Ashton, 2017; Naudin, 2013; Nesta, 2007). The paper reflects the need to critically align with the key concerns of design thinking led education, in fostering “student’s creative and reflexive capacities” (QAA, 2019); subsequently developing student’s critical understanding and active participation in learning, through an emphasis on the development of critical pedagogies. The objectives of this paper are to: 1) Introduce the method and approaches of design thinking in learning environments. 2) Explore the challenges academics face negotiating curricula, learning outcomes and assessment while focusing on design thinking approach to learning. 3) Reflect on teaching practice through design thinking approach in social settings.

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmExercise 02: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participants will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

3:00pm - 3:15pmGreen Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University
Session Chair: Yashar Kardar, Middle East Technical University

come and join for a chit chat

3:00pm - 3:15pmMusic 01: Traditional Chinese music break
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

you may like to relax while listening traditional Chinese instruments

Ms. Wei Zhang will be your DJ

3:15pm - 4:15pm01/1w: Workshop Track | Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Catalina Cortes, Universidad del Desarrollo
Session Chair: Úrsula Bravo, Universidad del Desarrollo
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to see the workshop's outline, select the session's title

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

FIDS for Kids: Empowering Children through Design

Natalia Allende1,3, Ruthie Sobel Luttenberg2,3

1Design for Change Chile; 2Design for Change Israel; 3Design for Change Global Inc

This workshop is designed as a theoretical-practical tool for educators to understand how to take the Design for Change methodology to the classroom and beyond. Chosen by the Unit-ed Nations as one of the 10 initiatives around the world that will allow humanity to reach the global development goals, Design for Change offers a simple, flexible, practical, and mean-ingful tool inspired by design thinking in the classroom setting with children of any age from 7 to 18. The presenters will offer attendees a theoretical approach to the mindset and spirit behind the Design for Change methodology, as well as a hands-on experience of this tool that allows for children to become empowered with their communities, solving real-world problems with concrete solutions while developing their I CAN mindset.

>> Attendees must bring paper, pencil or pen, colored pencils or markers. <<

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm03/1w: Workshop Track: Alternative Problem Framing in Design Education: Moving Beyond ‘Pain-Points’
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Lesley-Ann Noel, North Carolina State University
Session Chair: Sucharita Beniwal, National Institute of Design

NOTE: the workshop is limited to 20 participants

to see the workshop’s outline select the session title

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

Tilting to Transform. Sensorial problem-framing

Noemi Sadowska, Tara Hanrahan

London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, United Kingdom

This workshop will engage participants in a sequence of individual and group activities that utilise real and fictional sensorial modalities to reimagine problems and humanise design thinking. The 60 minutes online session will experiment with sensory scenarios and how they can enhance reframing and responsibly ‘tilt’ design problems and approaches, leading also to engaging participants in a discourse on the role of design within society and ecology. This workshop stems from wider research being undertaken into a system of teaching interventions that positively disrupt the curriculum, to catalyse and reinforce learning around design action and eco-social consequence. As such, this session seeks to explore creative and humanity-centred pedagogic approaches for reframing design problems and supporting responsible ideation.

The workshop will take place via Zoom, with the number of spaces limited to 20 and participants will need to be able to access Google documents provided during the workshop to contribute.

Please refer to the workshop presentation PDF to see the presentation slides and outputs.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm07/2wa: Workshop: Track 07 | Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Bryan Howell, Brigham Young University
Session Chair: JanWillem Hoftijzer, Delft Univ. of Technology

to see the workshop's outline, select the session's title

NOTE: this is the first part of the workshop, the second part is schedule here

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

New Immersive Workflows for Design and Production (session 1 of 2)

Mauricio Novoa1, Wenwen Zhang2, Jose Manuel Rodriguez Diaz3, Bryan Howell4, Jan Willem Hoftijzer3

1Western Sydney; 2University of Canterbury; 3Technical University of Delft; 4Brigham Young University, United States of America

Today, there is a lot of hype about new technologies such as immersive virtual reality (VR). After more than five decades, the unfulfilled prophecy that VR would be available to everybody seems to be nearby. These development raises the need to find out how is that design and its education will be influenced by technological change and how they can also benefit from it. The aim of this workshop is to collaborate, share and discuss how traditional and new means for ideation, sketching, simulation, and production can form a better design workflow. The participants will be invited to contribute analogue or digital concepts (e.g., pen and paper, tablet). A selection of sketches will be transferred to a virtual reality program and developed into a 3D simulation for later 3D printing. The team of presenters will work in flexible and distributed locations in Australia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, and the United States of America. Participants will be invited to share their own circumstances,

views, and aspirations in relation to the implementation and potential of new technology in

their own design education.

Keywords: design education, distributed collaboration, interaction design, user experience, virtual reality

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm08/1w: Workshop: Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Linda Nelson Keane, FAIA, NOMA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University

to see the workshop’s outline, select the session title

NOTE: the workshop is limited to 20 participants

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

The leftovers of participation; identifying the value of interaction-based design experiences

Andrea Wilkinson1,2, Steven Lenaers1,3

1LUCA School of Arts, Belgium; 2Thomas More University of Applied Sciences; 3Hasselt University

Falling under the theme of Design Learning Environments the workshop *The leftovers of participation* looks to identify ways to facilitate learning experiences through reflection. The workshop will draw on the personal experiences of participants and collectively analyse the knowledge generated from interaction. Drawing on these experiences (with clients, users, communities, etc), the workshop looks to identify the impact and value of these experiences as well as ways they can be integrated into design practice; with a focus on improving the holistic development of a student who is both citizen and changemaker .

This workshop will utilise two public links from Google Forms and Miro, thus participants must be able to access these tools.

Target participants: designer educators, design practitioners, post-graduate students and design researchers.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm10/1w: Workshop: Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ziyuan Wang, CAFA
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

to see the workshop’s outline select the session title

NOTE: the workshop is limited to 48 participants. The participants will work in teams of four.

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

Design Educators as Change Agents in RE-Designing Education

Robin Vande Zande

Kent State University, United States of America

The primary aim of this workshop is to generate ideas on re-designing education, worldwide. The participants, working in small teams, will use the design process steps to define strategies, approaches and rationale for ways that design educators could be change agents in the future of education. A context will be provided from a 2019 international symposium entitled Re-Designing Education to Shape a Better World. The symposium, which took place in Florence, Italy, brought together thought leaders that represented 14 countries from diverse ethnicities, cultures, and backgrounds. Reasons for why education is changing will be covered along with key concepts for improving education that emerged at the symposium. The overview will culminate with the relationship to those concepts and how they foreshadowed today’s changing times as a result of the COVID pandemic disruption. After the conference, the workshop leader will synthesize the ideas into a report, which will be circulated to various design educators and organizations.

 
4:15pm - 4:30pmh01a: How was your day?
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Úrsula Bravo, Universidad del Desarrollo
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design

meet with the Track Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

4:15pm - 4:30pmh01b: How was your day?
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Lesley-Ann Noel, North Carolina State University

meet with the Track Alternative Problem Framing in Design Education: Moving Beyond ‘Pain-Points’ chair

4:15pm - 4:30pmh01c: How was your day?
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Bryan Howell, Brigham Young University

meet with the Track Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge chair

4:15pm - 4:30pmh01d: How was your day?
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Eva Lutnæs, Oslo Metropolitan University
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

meet with the Track Empowering Critical Design Literacy chair

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

4:15pm - 4:30pmh01e: How was your day?
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, SUAD/NUA

meet with the Track Design Educators as Change Agents chair

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

Date: Saturday, 25/Sept/2021
12:30pm - 12:40pmd02: Welcome
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, SUAD/NUA
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning Wang & Hong Liang

12:40pm - 1:05pmp02: Plenary Session
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning Wang & Hong Liang

 

Editorial: Alternative problem framing in design education

Lesley-Ann Noel1, Renata Marques Leitao2, Hannah Korsmeyer3, Sucharita Beniwal4, Woodrow W. Winchester5

1North Carolina State University; 2Cornell University; 3Monash University; 4National Institute of Design; 5University of Maryland

Problem Framing helps designers define issues they want to focus on and make issues more focused and addressable. In Industrial design and several other design disciplines, designers use ‘pain points’ or points of friction in the user experience to support problem framing and to elucidate areas where they can intervene and improve the experience of the person they are designing for. Many design challenges start with a search for ‘pain points’ that designers can solve. This is a specific and useful type of problem frame. However, this can lead to an excessive focus on (and even fetishization of) the pain and distress of other people. There is also tension around who defines the problem and why.

The focus on pain and deficit approaches can send problematic messaging about a community’s lived experience, reinforcing a one-dimensional portrayal of these people as depleted or broken (Leitão 2020; Tuck 2009). The ways in which issues are framed can depend on one’s positionality and point of view. In the same way that designers can choose to frame issues around pain points, they can also choose to frame issues with other starting points that are not pain and damage-centered.



Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations

Arild Berg1, Camilla Groth4, Fausto Medola2, Kate Sellen3

1OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway; 2Sao Paulo State University, Brazil; 3OCAD University, Canada; 4University of South East Norway

Exploring challenges related to co-creation practices when disciplinary world views 'crash' and what the implications of these are for design education.



Track 10 Editorial: Design Educators as Change Agents

XIang Xia1, Ziyuan Wang2, Yang Zhang3

1School of Design, Nanjing University of the Arts, Nanjing, China, People's Republic of; 2School of Design, Central Academic of Fine Arts, Beijing, China, People's Republic of; 3Shandong University of Art & Design (SUAD), Jinan, China, People's Republic of

In this track, the collection of the invited 16 submissions exemplifies teaching and learning experiences in design education research including 12 research papers, 2 case studies, and 2 workshop proposals. The submission explored the theme from different cultural perspectives which ranged from the insight of teaching creativity and design thinking, designers in a studio, design knowledge and methods applied in design classes, and the leadership and related course settings. Moreover, these studies employed diverse methods including verification research, case studies, exploratory study, protocol study, and empirical studies.

 
1:05pm - 1:30pmpl02a: Richard Buchanan: Promoting Educational Practices to Support Critical Approaches by the Design Academics and the Students
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University

to access submission’s abstract and PDF please select the session's title

Richard Buchanan will reflect on his experiences while he was the Head of the School of Design and the Director of the Center for Design and Organizational Change at Carnegie Mellon University. He will discuss challenges he and his colleagues experienced while trying to develop educational practices which will support critical approaches by the design academics and the students. Although most of the Design schools/faculties/departments are aiming to develop more critical practices, implementing and embedding the critical pedagogical practices are extremely challenging as it requires the cultural transformation of the practices of how the Design academics are trained (educated).

Richard Buchanan is Professor of Design & Innovation at Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University and Chair Professor of Design Theory, Practice, and Entrepreneurship, College of Design & Innovation, Tongji University. He is the Editor, Design Issues: A Journal of design history, theory, criticism published by MIT Press. https://weatherhead.case.edu/faculty/george-buchanan

Buchanan, R. (2004). Design, Making, and a New Culture of Inquiry. In D. P. Resnick & D. S. Scott (Eds.), The Innovative University (pp. 159–180). https://www.cmu.edu/innovativeuniversity/chapters_ch12.html

use this link to dowload the the capter 

1:30pm - 2:00pmDesign Education in China 02: Tsinghua University +Q&A
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Chao Zhao, Academy of Arts & Design , Tsinghua University
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design

Meet with scholars from the Design Programmes in China to find out how is Design Education organised in Chinese Universities

 

1:30pm - 2:00pmExercise 03: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participants will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG

1:30pm - 2:00pmMuseum 02: SUAD collection show
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Hui Guo, Shandong University of Art & Design

Shandong University of Art & Design museum is composed of Sun Changlin Art Museum and Oriental Chinese Crafts Museum. Its collection consists of ancient and modern ceramics and stone Buddha statues, traditional folk life utensils, toys, Chinese New Year pictures, embroideries etc.

1:30pm - 2:00pmRed Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University

come and join for a chit chat

2:00pm - 3:00pm01/2: Track | Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Fabio Andrés Téllez, Appalachian State University
Session Chair: Natalia Allende, Natalia Allende Studio
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

select the session's title to access the submissions’' abstracts and files

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

Measuring the Impact of Integrating Human-Centered Design in Existing Higher Education Courses

Saadeddine Shehab, Carol Guo

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States of America

The purpose of this research is to describe the development of a survey that can be used to measure the impact of integrating Human-Centered Design (HCD) on students’ knowledge of performing its processes in existing higher education courses. The survey was developed based on a research-based HCD taxonomy that outlines the design spaces, the processes, and practices that define what it means for students to implement HCD within the context of k-12 or higher education settings. The survey consisted of 23 items and was pilot tested with 46 students. Validity and reliability analyses were conducted, and the survey items were revised in light of the findings. More items were also added to the existing survey. The development and use of this survey can promote efforts of scaling the integration of HCD in existing higher education courses.



2:20pm - 2:40pm

Assessing Learning Performance and Using Preference of Design Thinking Methods in Graduate Interdisciplinary Online Course

Juan Li1,2, Shuo-fang Liu1, Meng-xun Ho1, Zhe Li3

1College of Planning and Design, Cheng Kung University; 2College of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Huaqiao University; 3Faculty of Education, Fujian normal university

Under the COVID-19 epidemic, faced with the problem of ensuring the quality of teaching online, Design Thinking, as a design teaching and evaluation tool for interdisciplinary collaborative courses, has attracted much attention. The research purpose is to explore the performance and preference of four popular design thinking methods in interdisciplinary online courses. This study took an intensive online course as the case study, which developed curriculum based on Brainstorming, Crazy8, User Journey Mapping and Storyboarding. Quantitative evaluation and Evaluation Grid Method were adopted to compare participants’ performance and preference of these four design thinking methods. The results revealed that, compared with Crazy 8, Brainstorming which has the characteristics of open communication and out-of-convention ideas may be the reason why industrial design students are more prominent in Flexibility and Elaboration. By contrast, compared with User Journey Mapping, Storyboarding performed better in Originality and Elaboration than others. This study provides an educational scientific reference of design thinking methods and expects to help educators improve the design curriculum in the future.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

I Can and I Will: A Study of ‘Grit’ in a Collaborative Team Learning Studio Pedagogical Culture

Zhengping Liow

Singapore Polytechnic, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Despite its long history, architecture education remains under-theorised. Design educators’ faith in the ubiquitous Master and Apprentice (M&A) pedagogy is increasingly worrying where knowledge is tacitly transferred in asymmetrical power structured environments through the ‘Hidden Curriculum’. Some students thrived. While some did not. Were some learners grittier than others? Grit (passion and perseverance for long-term goals) was often used as predictors of academic success. The experimental heterarchical Collaborative Team Learning (CTL) studio pedagogical culture departs from the ‘Mystery-as-Mastery’ authoritarian one-on-one (OOO) pedagogy, characterised by the tutor-induced cross-pollinative peer-to-peer formative reviews in normalising daily ‘setbacks’ relating to their individual projects. The three-year longitudinal research explored possibilities of inculcating Grit capitalised on their first-year’s CTL architecture studio experience. Inferential statistics revealed that both CTL and OOO learners failed to register positive growth in their Grit despite CTL’s significant outperformance during their first year. This is a timely study of exploiting design education’s ambiguous and iterative nature in investigating the viability of instilling learners’ Grit in preparation for an increasingly uncertain future.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm02/2: Empowering Critical Design Literacy
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Hanna Hofverberg, Malmö University
Session Chair: Ingvill Gjerdrum Maus, Oslo Metropolitan University

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Encountering development in social design education

Lesley-Ann Noel

North Carolina State University, United States of America

Design for social good is an area of design in which designers focus on social problems. One way of teaching this type of content is through classes with an international component that mimics an international development project, where students work as a consulting team for an organization in a developing country. However, this type of class sometimes replicates problematic structures in international development such as neocolonialism, the perception that knowledge comes from the Global North. This paper details a workshop that was created to disrupt the negative narratives in this kind of global social design project, such as the design saviour narrative, by introducing elements from critical pedagogy such as critical reflection, examining bias and positionality, introducing ethnographic techniques, and intentionally flipping the power dynamics of the collaboration. Over a two-weekend workshop, students at an American university collaborated with students at a university in the Caribbean. Instead of going through the entire design process, this short class focused on the tension and unfamiliar roles that the students played when the students from the Global South were tasked with identifying issues of their colleagues and other participants from the Global North. The American students expressed their discomfort at being 'studied' at several points during the two-session design workshop. This paper aims to help other educators create learning experiences where students examine their positionality, privilege, and biases, while also creating a space for them to practice humility and reflect on power dynamics in international design work in a very intentional way.



Exploring practices of critical design literacy. A comparative study of two lower secondary school design project

Eva Lutnæs

Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

We have destabilized nature by design. The Anthropocene epoch requires a fundamental redirection of the purpose of design and design education. This empirical review explores two design projects—Repair and Ecovillage—at the level of lower secondary education in Norway. The review examines ways in which pupils are challenged to question, rethink and transform unsustainable practices of everyday living. A metho¬dological framework consisting of four narratives is used to identify design skills and discuss the potential empowerment of critical design literacy. In the Repair project, pupils’ question practices of the fashion industry and responsible consumption while they design kits for mending clothes. The Ecovillage project challenges pupils to explore how architecture can lower carbon footprint and enable shared-living. The Repair project empowers the pupils to transform un-sustainable practices present in the roles of consumers. The Ecovillage project asks pupils to claim a role as redirective designers and discern the possibilities of architecture to nudge change in our modes of being in this world.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm04/2: Collaboration in Design Education
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Fatma Korkut, Middle East Technical Univ.

select the session title to access submissions’ abstracts and files 

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

Educational programs in between Design and Supply Chain. Significant Examples of Academia-SMEs Joint Labs in Italy.

Gabriele Goretti1, Gianni Denaro2

1Jiangnan University - School of Design - China, People's Republic of; 2Rome Sapienza University -Planning, Design and Technology of Architecture

Locate: Furniture manufacturing in Italy is based on interconnected small and medium-sized enterprises based on craftsmanship know-how. Focus: These companies have under-taken profound transformations within the production chain in a logic of "advanced crafts-manship", integrating enabling technologies into high-quality craftsmanship processes. This transformation is aiming at shaping "intelligent enterprises" and it requires new design pro-fessionals able to work with systemic view, connecting design competencies to an overview on the supply chain issues. Report: In this context, Academia-Industry Joint programs could train design managers able to understand, acquire and integrate the tangible and intangible values of manufacturing culture and technological innovations. The research reports on Joint Labs cases studies in between Academia and SMEs that aimed at defining innovative design paths based on digitalization of production and production management. Argue: The presented experiences highlight on how the overall training systems provided by University could represent a significant booster within the entire digitization process and the innova-tion management. In fact, the laboratories have been involved within specific production steps of the companies.



2:20pm - 2:40pm

Collaboration Practices in Industrial Design Education: The Case of METU from a Historical Perspective, 1981-2021

Naz A G Z Börekçi, Gülay Hasdoğan, Fatma Korkut

Middle East Technical University

METU Industrial Design Department, as one of the leading educational institutions in Turkey, has more than 20 years of experience in collaboration projects with external partners. Collaboration with external partners has been a well-established instrument in design studio pedagogy at the undergraduate level in particular. Whether and in which ways the collaboration schemes, the collaborators, their goals and roles have evolved in time received relatively little attention in literature. This paper reviews the collaboration practices of the Department from a historical perspective with cross-references to the local context, identifying the internal and external factors that shaped the design education and research agenda of the Department, as well as the collaboration schemes followed. Revealing five periods of collaboration with external partners in the Department’s history, the study puts forth that established schemes followed for collaboration projects in industrial design education contribute to the building and sustainment of collaboration with the right partners, grounded and contextualised project briefs, and an approach that puts education first.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

Reflections on shared mood boards: Examining craft-education students’ conceptual design

Anniliina Omwami, Henna Lahti, Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen

University of Helsinki, Finland

This study examines what kind of different meanings craft-education students give to collaboratively created mood boards. As part of their compulsory studies, 11 craft-education students from a Finnish university were assigned to develop shared mood boards in team design sessions. After creating the mood board, each student was instructed to design an outfit utilising the team’s mood board. The data (i.e., video-recorded interviews, photographs of the students’ written or drawn material, teams’ mood boards, and participants’ idea-books) was analysed qualitatively. The results indicated that the meaning came from the active role the mood board played in anchoring idea development and expanding and deepening students’ idea space. Conversely, the mood boards were also found to have a limiting and superficial meaning in the individual processes. Our findings could be beneficial for developing teacher education and design teaching; thus, information on students’ views of different phenomena are always valuable.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm05/1: Track | Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Camilla Groth, University of South-Eastern Norway
Session Chair: Arild Berg, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Learning design, co-designing learning. Collaborative Learning Design Workshops for innovation in teaching/learning and faculty development programs.

Stefano Perna, Pietro Nunziante

University of Naples Federico II, Italy

The paper explores the field of Collaborative Learning Design Workshops, a specific type of par-ticipatory workshop designed to facilitate the process of co-designing learning experiences by interdisciplinary teams of academics and educators from all backgrounds. An overview of the field of Learning Design or “Design for Learning” is presented. A specific case study is then pre-sented, The Learning Experience Design workshop a co-design workshop designed and run by the authors as part of the F.E.D.E.R.I.C.O. faculty development program for innovation in teaching and learning targeted to newly hired lecturers and researchers at the University of Naples Fed-erico II, Italy. The workshop is aimed at promoting a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach for the innovation in teaching practices, with a special focus on blended and remote learning scenarios. In doing so the workshop introduce collaborative design and co-creation practices among academics from very different backgrounds. The workshop presented is an adaptation of a well established model, the ABC Learning Design Workshop developed at the UCL, and has been adjusted and partially re-designed by the authors to fit the specific context of the project and the remote online collaboration scenario imposed by the Coronavirus emergency. Details on the implementation of the workshop and discussion are finally presented.



Siloed in Breaking Silos: A Case Study of Interdisciplinary Curriculum (Mis)Alignment

JiaYing Chew1,2

1University of the Arts London, LCC; 2National University of Singapore

Higher Education Institutes globally are rapidly developing inter/ transdisciplinary education initi-atives at varying scales. However, several operational challenges persist in interdisciplinary teach-ing as there are few incentives to share resources or engage in discourses for mutual decon-struction of knowledge frameworks. Nonetheless, collaboration and communication are vital to bridge the varying epistemic frameworks when different disciplines are brought together. Espe-cially because the way individuals understand concepts contain traces of disciplinary- specifici-ties; without clarity through a common platform, the messiness is reflected in the curriculum de-sign, development and delivery of interdisciplinary courses. Reflecting upon a case study of an interdisciplinary graduate programme that was experiencing curriculum (mis)alignment; this pa-per illustrates how co-design can be adopted in curriculum development processes to overcome existing operational challenges of interdisciplinary teaching.



Design for Justice Lab. Interdisciplinarity in times of virtual education

Santiago De Francisco Vela, Laura Guzman-Abello, Santiago Pardo Rodríguez

Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

There is a growing interest in the formation of interdisciplinary competencies focused on issues of access to justice. The Design for Justice Lab is a bet between the Schools of Law, Design, and Engineering of Universidad de los Andes to promote challenge-based learning by articulating knowledge among multiple disciplines. The Lab has had five cohorts, of which two have been in classroom mode, and three have been in virtual mode due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The following document presents the opportunities and challenges of developing interdisciplinary courses with courts, judges, and administrative organizations to improve access to justice in Colombia. We will present nine projects developed by students, explaining their approach and their proposed solution. Finally, there will be a reflection on the transition to virtual format and the opportunities this presents to continue with multimodal, interdisciplinary educational models.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm08/2: Track | Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Katja Thoring, Anhalt University
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 

A Game Implementation Approach for Design Education

Duhan Ölmez1, Fehmi Doğan2

1Yaşar Üniversitesi, Turkey; 2Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey

This paper proposes a new implementation of video games to be used as an architectural design education tool within design studios. There are studies which include video games in design educa-tion, however, they include video games either as mere representational media, or simplified de-sign environments, or as just visualization tools. Video games’ structures provide a ground for de-signing with constraints to find solutions to ill-defined design problems with a trial-and-error pro-cess. As an addition to traditional master and apprentice model of learning in the studio, video games can reduce the workload of the tutors and allow them to focus on design itself rather than focusing on hard constraints. Video games provide a highly immersive, fast, and accurate feedback to students to improve their designing skills, allow them to generate a design library and provide a platform to gain know-how in terms of solving design problems. Our contemporary architectural design education can benefit from the proposed implementation method with the video games in the market.



Architectural Design Studio as an 'Extended Problem Space'

F. Zeynep Ata, Fehmi Dogan

Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey

Drawing on the foundational theory of Zone of Proximal Development, this paper approaches dominant architectural design studio pedagogies critically and explores how the concept of ‘extended problem space’ can help develop better pedagogies for design learning. A conceptual framework is introduced through a theoretical understanding of architectural design studios’ multi-layered environmental sphere of cognitive systems based on previous research on studio education. The formation of the framework is inspired by an earlier study carried out in knowledge production and transmission processes in a research laboratory that considers the human and non-human components of the laboratory within an evolutionary mechanism. Cognitive components of architectural design studios, hence, are described through the social, cultural, material, and temporal dimensions within an understanding of embodied, distributed, enculturated, situated, and extended cognition. Next step of this conceptual study is to explore architectural design studios’ cognitive systems empirically to investigate dynamics among cognitive components in different settings.



Immersive Learning: from Basic Design for Communication Design. A Theoretical Framework

Yuan Liu1, Dina Ricco'2, Daniela Anna Calabi2

1Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, China; 2Politecnico di Milano, Italy

In this paper we discuss the two changes that basic design education faced: one is the teaching need of transformation from visual to multisensory and synaesthetic communication; the other is the use of virtual environments to teach design. As an answer to the trend of constructivist learning, also in order to fulfill the need for multisensory training, the discussion of an innovative learning environment for basic design education has become essential. The problems remain, as virtual technology has limitations regarding visualizing abstract concepts. This research aims to build an immersive virtual environment to teach basic design, along with the value of subjective immersive experience for design learning in general. The study presented in this paper proposes a theoretical framework, starting with the redefinition of the concepts of “immersion” and “presence” from a cognitive perspective (Scuri, 2017). The main research method is based on two groups of case studies; through literature review and secondary research, this work categorizes the factors of presence into a three-dimensional framework, also defining the four typologies of immersion and two in-class educational models. The paper presents the results of the research at the first phase, aimed at bridging the gap between design learning and virtual spaces. Through the framework addressed, we are able to frame an actual design tool with the help of online platforms and tools.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm10/2: Track | Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Xiang Xia, Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 

Reform of Product Design Teaching based on Bionic Concepts

Meng-Dar Shieh1, Hsu-Chan Hsiao1, Yu-Ting Hsiao2

1National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, China; 2Asia University, Taiwan, China

Various innate beauty and wonderful operating modes exist in nature. Identifying creativity from physical features of organisms or biological strategies in nature and applying such new conceptual elements and methods to product development is an increasingly popular approach in contemporary product design. This study used teaching practice verification methods to summarize a set of bionic design methods and product development procedures. Through LAMDA method of lean thinking, this study understood users’ authentic needs of target products and the product value. Then, a Mandala Chart was used explore the biological strategies and forms of bionic targets. Subsequently, the summarized bionic Mandala Chart was incorporated into the causal diagram of the lean-thinking-based product development process, thereby activating bionic creativity in product functions. Finally, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation (FCE) was employed to conduct fuzzy evaluation of students’ design outcomes. The results con-firmed that the proposed teaching approach can help students rapidly grasp the relationship between thinking models and creativity orientations, as well as facilitate student operation of the design process. The design outcomes were interpreted using the maximum degree of membership. Experts’ evaluation of the proposed design cases reached “good” or better levels. Favorable product design evaluations can improve product development efficiency and help realize students’ bionic design applications. The results serve as references for teaching of main product design courses.



Inquiry Practice design Teaching in Application-oriented University:Idea,Model and Case

Jianpeng Zheng

Shandong university of Art and Design, People's Republic of China

Inquiry practice is proposed based on the training objectives of high-level application-oriented talents of design major in Application-oriented Colleges and universities. It originates from inquiry learning, but it is very different from inquiry learning, research learning and research practice. Its characteristics of emphasizing free operation, open autonomy and vivid activities are especially suitable for application in practice teaching of design major. Taking the undergraduate course "brand communication design" during the epidemic period in 2020 as an example, this paper discusses the curriculum logic, teaching process and teaching methods of inquiry practice teaching of design major in application-oriented universities, and puts forward some ideas on the ecosystem of inquiry practice teaching of design major.



Learning patterns in architectural design studios

Julie Milovanovic

AAU-CRENAU, France

Learning how to design as an architect is the main objective of architectural design studios. Stu-dents develop design knowledge as they learn by designing, guided by their tutors. This study highlights characteristics of design critiques organization over time by analyzing design activities (designing vs. explain design) and collaboration between students and tutors. In this exploratory study, four design critiques from a master design studio in architecture are analyzed based on the protocol analysis methodology. Moments when students can acquire design knowledge are identified based on the type of design activity: designing - Description, Reflection, Design Move – or explaining design - Precedent, Design principle or Methodology. The findings reveal that de-sign critiques are mainly focused on designing itself (tacit knowledge) more than explaining how to design (explicit knowledge). This provides empirical support for Donald Schön’s description of learning design in the studios through a learning-by-imitation approach. Interestingly, collabora-tion between students and tutors appeared in each design critique which shows a high engage-ment of all the participants to the critique.

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmBlack Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Yashar Kardar, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University

come and join for a chit chat

3:00pm - 3:15pmExercise 04: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participants will learn 8 movements

Interpreter: Ning WANG

3:00pm - 3:15pmMusic 02: Traditional Chinese music break
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

you may like to relax while listening traditional Chinese instruments

Ms. Wei Zhang will be your DJ

3:15pm - 4:15pm01/3: Track | Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Natalia Allende, Natalia Allende Studio
Session Chair: Fabio Andrés Téllez, Appalachian State University
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

select the session's title to access the submissions’ abstracts and files

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 
3:15pm - 3:35pm

Study on the Implementation of the Innovative Enterprise Product Design Model for Industrial Design Students

Shuo-Fang Liu1, Jui-Feng Chang1, Chang-Tzuoh Wu2

1National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, China; 2National Kaohsiung Normal University, Taiwan, China

Industrial design education often prompts students to focus on creativity and user needs, and lacks knowledge and concepts in marketing and sales. Thus, this study proposed the “Innovative Enterprise Product Design Model” and planned a teaching course to teach the theoretical knowledge and application methods of this design model. Solving the problem where students’ designs are often out of touch with the industry. This study is divided into three stages. The first stage invites industrial design students to carry out product design using this design model. The second stage invites experts to evaluate the students’ design results. For the third stage, students are invited to fill in the feedback questionnaire. According to the study results, the students believed that they performed well and improved their innovation ability, product strategy formulation, and design maturity. They were also able to master the operation of the design model. The experts also believed that the design achievements were excellent in all aspects. And the results also proved the feasibility of this design model.



3:35pm - 3:55pm

Different Ideas, Lots of Ideas: A design course that enhances the creative abilities of college students

Jody Nyboer1, Brad Hokanson2

1Syracuse University, School of Design, United States of America; 2University of Minnesota, College of Design, United States of America

This Creative thinking is the ability to generate a wide and detailed range of responses to a given stimulus. It is not a fixed skill; it can be improved through practice. Creative Problem Solving (CPS) is a design course that fosters these abilities. The challenge-based course utilizes a generative learning approach. Students are given a series of assignments that prompt them to ‘do some-thing differently’ (i.e., eat something different). In their quest towards designing unique solutions, the students are forced to define the contextual meaning of each challenge, and to question how cultural, social, and personal norms limit their ideas. The course integrates peer evaluations to encourage originality among the local group and to reveal alternative perspectives. The TTCT is used to measure their creative thinking skills at the beginning and end of the course. Analyzing data from nine offerings of the course (n=445) suggests that CPS significantly improves the originality and fluency of student ideas. Considering that these skills are highly desired among the entrant workforce for industries both inside and outside design, a comparable course should be fundamental to the college experience for all students.



3:55pm - 4:15pm

Assessment of Ideation Effectiveness in Design Thinking: The Impact of Morphological Analysis in the Process of Creative Problem Solving

Farzaneh Eftekhari, Mohammad Jahanbakht, Farnoosh Sharbafi

University of Texas at Arlington, United States of America

Creative problem solving (CPS) emerged as a critical soft skill for students, yet the evaluation and effectiveness of the CPS methods is not fully understood. This study examined the ideation effectiveness of junior design students. Students are asked to ideate for a complex challenge, a 1000-floor elevator in two phases, with a morphological analysis (MA) method introduced to them as an intervention after the first phase. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the MA method in the students’ ideation process and their creative thinking by using four measures of novelty, quality, quantity, and variety using the quantitative and qualitative methods. The result of this study supports the positive impact of MA method in CPS process. Similar challenges to the 1000-floor challenge are recommended for the early sessions of design thinking courses to inform educators about students’ creativity performance. Further, the quantitative assessment method of this study may be applied to assess the other CPS methods in design thinking courses.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm03/1: Alternative Problem Framing in Design Education
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Lesley-Ann Noel, North Carolina State University
Session Chair: Sucharita Beniwal, National Institute of Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Play Probes: Understanding young people through playful expressions

Line Christiansen, Sune Gudiksen

Design School Kolding, Denmark

Understanding young people can be a difficult matter when one is past that age. Stories of misunderstandings stemming from generational divides are ubiquitous. A virus, such as Covid-19, threatens to create a deeper generational divide and possibly lead to the problem reaching a magnitude not seen before.

This paper investigates how probes with play triggers can yield a deeper understanding of today’s youth. By analyzing the outcome of 54 youth-created play probes, clustered themes were identified, and the selected ones have been presented in detail. The prelimi-nary conclusions indicate that the play probes allow access to insights about young people using expressive formats such as construction and fantasy play.

This study contributes to design research by illustrating how probes can help learn about the inner workings of the young generations. Further, it suggests that adding play to probes can foster enhanced social interactions in families with teenage members.



Environmental Education in Protected Areas in Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro: children as agents of empathy for and engagement with the cause of nature conservation

Marianne von Lachmann, Rita Maria de Souza Couto, Roberta Portas

PUC-Rio (Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro), Brazil

This article presents examples of environmental education programs and events run in protected areas of Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, and a brief overview of novel findings in the histo-ry, sociology, anthropology, and geography of childhood, converging with those from the area of education, in which children’s agency in cultural production, the diversity of children’s cultures, and multiple childhoods are recognized. This article outlines the importance of continued efforts to take children from private and public schools, from kindergarten to high school, to engage in play-ful activities in preserved nature, as demonstrated in the initiatives described. When the full po-tential of protected areas is harnessed for children’s development and education, in particular by helping them forge emotional bonds with space, which transform space into place and are essen-tial for human memory, then new ways of fostering empathy and engagement with nature conser-vation can come to light. These attributes kindle and excite curiosity, the desire to learn and dis-cover, boosting the learning process in an organic, spontaneous, and integrated way.



Reframing Ageing in Design Education: A Case Study

Emma Gieben-Gamal

Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh

People in the later stages of life make up one of the most differentiated and experientially rich groups in society which should make design for an ageing population one of the most stimulating areas for design practice. Yet ‘old’ age in the UK is largely framed as a problem to be solved; a position that design often (unconsciously) serves to perpetuate and reinforce. This case study will outline the context for an undergraduate course that seeks to overturn this negative frame that not only ‘others’ older people but also begets a paradoxical self-othering of our future selves. Picking up on the themes of power and voice in framing activities alongside the way problems are conceived and who defines them, the case study will outline the context, content and theoretical underpinnings of the course. It will also use student feedback and responses to demonstrate the value of addressing these issues at an undergraduate level and the ways in which this learning can be applied more widely to other areas of social design.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm04/3: Collaboration in Design Education
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Fatma Korkut, Middle East Technical Univ.

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 
3:15pm - 3:35pm

Preparing to introduce design thinking in middle schools

Michael Robert Gibson, Keith Michael Owens, Peter Hyland, Christina Donaldson

The University of North Texas, United States of America

This case study critically analyses and describes knowledge gained and understandings constructed by a team of university-based design educators and researchers who engaged in the planning necessary to begin introducing specific aspects of design thinking in middle school classrooms in an Texas city of more than 140,000. (Middle schools in the U.S. typically educate students aged 11 to 14 years.) This piece articulates key insights about how and why the introduction of design thinking should be collaboratively and strategically planned if it is to function as an effective augmentation of a college preparatory curricula, and the learning experiences that constitute this, at this educational level. The authors, all of whom are art and design educators, share what they learned from an ongoing—three years-plus—collaboration with key school district administrators and advisors, curricular planners, middle school instructors, and more than 90 middle school students. The intent of this discourse is to provide readers with actionable means to effectively prepare the groundwork for introducing design thinking in actual middle school classrooms.

For those in the design education + research communities around the world who may wish to “learn from what we have learned” re: working with school admin and faculty to introduce design thinking into middle school classrooms, our presentation is also available as a video on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PztbOIFQSw

The video includes captions in English, Urdu, Mandarin, Spanish, French, German, Japanese, Hindi, Turkish, and Portuguese.



3:35pm - 3:55pm

SOCIALLY-ENGAGED DISTANCE DESIGN COLLABORATION

Kardelen Aysel1, Can Güvenir1,2

1Yasar University, Turkey; 2Izmir Design Factory, Turkey

Applied design education was required to replicate the socially constructivist structure through digital tools due to Covid-19 Pandemic. However the effects of the distant design education over the students’ learning experience is not stated yet. For this reason, this study aims to discuss how the affective learning outcomes, creative and design self-efficacy and visual literacy level, of design students. Within this framework, the effects of distance education in the scope of introduction to industrial design course was indicated and discussed through reflections and self-evaluation surveys. The study was held with 26 1st year industrial design students in the fall semester of 2020-2021 academic year. Digital collaboration tools on the students’ perspective provides a ground for socialization and group work, simultaneously supporting distant collaboration in the educational perspective. This interaction comes forward as a motivational support for students, more importantly leads to an increased level of self-awareness in various layers of learning.



3:55pm - 4:15pm

Improving intercultural collaboration with visual thinking

Kelly M. Murdoch-Kitt1, Denielle J. Emans2

1Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, University of Michigan, United States of America; 2Roger Williams University, United States of America

Intercultural collaboration is one strategy for promoting inclusion and innovation in design education. Bringing two or more cultures together in an environment facilitates learning from each other’s varied perspectives and ultimately creates positive interpersonal gains and design outcomes. This study explicates how visual thinking can address unspoken stumbling blocks that can disrupt teamwork. These barriers include unconscious bias, stereotyping, and other deeply held beliefs. This research is based on observations and virtual classroom interactions with remote collaborators located in North America and the Gulf Arab Region. The findings suggest that ignoring the existence of unconscious bias can maintain social and cultural barriers between teammates, thus restricting the opportunities for innovative approaches to collaborative projects and stifling a team’s outcomes (Murdoch-Kitt & Emans, 2020). Conversely, establishing trust helps teams reach their full potential (Katzen-bach & Smith, 1993). This inclusive approach to design is important in giving voice to underrepresented groups by opening up opportunities for discussion, dialogue, and understanding amongst team members.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm05/2: Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: KM Sellen, OCAD U
Session Chair: Fausto Orsi Medola, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP)

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Systemic Design education in interdisciplinary environments: enhancing a co-disciplinary approach towards Circular Economy

Asja Aulisio, Amina Pereno, Fabiana Rovera, Silvia Barbero

Politecnico di Torino, Italy

The transition of our linear economic models towards a Circular Economy is perceived as a pressing need at European level. A growing body of literature highlights the demand for new skills to facilitate this transition: more than new professions, it is about specific profes-sional skills for circular businesses. The European Erasmus+ project MULTITRACES falls within this scenario and is based on the co-creation of a multidisciplinary online training pro-gramme that involved Systemic Design in collaboration with other scientific and economic disciplines. The learning process focused on the acquisition of both hard and soft skills rele-vant to the Circular Economy in the rural area, through a structure combining a vertical ap-proach to disciplinary topics, with a horizontal approach based on teamwork on industrial issues. The experience gained within the Systemic Design module opens a structured reflec-tion on how to teach design to students from different backgrounds, how design skills can foster a co-disciplinary approach to complex issues, such as the Circular Economy, and how digital tools can support design education.



Interdisciplinary Boundary Experiences: Learning through Conversations.

Laura Ferrarello, Catherine Dormor

Royal College of Art, United Kingdom

The complexity of many social systems and organisations together with the challenges the world is facing in terms of climate and health demands imagining new ideas and approaches. Interdisciplinary collaboration offers good examples of strategies and practices better able to cope with this complexity, but they are reliant upon the dynamics within collaborations and good integration of perspectives. This paper considers an example of interdisciplinary collaboration aimed at growing mindsets capable of dialoguing with other disciplines through the boundary learning. Based within the Royal College of Art Master in Research, we stimulated a learning experience that leveraged the cyclical dynamics of multi-disciplinary conversations towards an integrated space for knowledge production. This has been assessed through the students’ response to a collaborative project, in which cross-discipline groups developed activities for public engagement through collective research practices. This paper specifically focuses upon the role of conversation in interdisciplinarity as a learning method that harnesses different kinds of knowledge at the boundaries of their discipline and thus facilitates interdisciplinary integration of different disciplines.



Using Creative Practice in Interdisciplinary Education

Bilge Merve Aktaş1, Camilla Groth2

1Aalto University, Finland; 2University of South-Eastern Norway

Interdisciplinary approaches in education help future professionals build better understanding and a common language between disciplines and individuals. To make such leaps, skills in adjusting to new situations and rapidly changing knowledge systems are needed. Such skills are intrinsic to design practice, and design and making practices lend themselves well to such personal development. Design and making activities also offer opportunities for students from different disciplines to gather around central topics and engage in interdisciplinary discussions about matters that concern everyone and to materialize their understanding while reflecting on their personal process. In this paper, we present a course design in which this type of transformational reflection might take place, and we discuss how designing and making processes can provide suitable means to build a platform for interdisciplinary discussions and learning. By examining an interdisciplinary group of students’ creative processes, we found that navigating unknown situations with the explorative and adaptive mindset that emerges through reflection creates transferrable skills that are useful in interdisciplinary interactions and communication.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm08/3: Track | Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Katja Thoring, Anhalt University
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 

Teaching with Virtual Simulation: Is It Helpful?

Meng Yue Ding, Yi Ke Hu, Zhi Hao Kang, Yi Jia Feng

Tianjin University, China, People's Republic of

A growing number of construction-related virtual simulations demonstrate the benefits of providing students with a realistic and interactive learning experience to help them develop knowledge applicable to real-world situations. Virtual simulation provides a new form of teaching for physical experiments with high complexity, safety hazards, and excessive space. This study examined a course on the construction of Chinese traditional wood architecture for students majoring in architecture and related subjects. An experimental teaching platform with virtual simulation was utilized to respond to challenges of physical experiments. A questionnaire was administered to 74 undergraduate students and three teachers, and interviews were conducted with a subset of the participants. The results revealed that virtual simulation was helpful for students and teachers. This case study highlighted the potential of experimentation in the learning process through new technologies and reflected on whether the application of new technology was helpful to students majoring in architecture design.



Designing Criteria for Developing Educational Multimedia Games

Chaitanya Solanki1, Deepak John Mathew2

1Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India; 2Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India

Increasing research is being done into the relationship between learning and games in recent years. Player engagement and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation have shown to be pertinent in improving the quality of knowledge retention in game-based learning environments. Similarly, the use of multimedia in game-based learning environments has also shown to have significant potential for effective learning; however, it is unclear whether a generalized criterion can be designed for it. This work presents a review of theories and guidelines that pertain to learning environments, game design, and multimedia learning, in an effort to distill the key elements which can help develop design criteria that can contribute to efficient educational multimedia game development.



Utilising Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) as a Pedagogical Framework for Design Thinking Projects

Adela Glyn-Davies1, Clive David Hilton2

1University of Derby; 2Coventry University

The University of Derby (UoD) and Jiangxi University of Technology (JXUT) run annual, joint pro-jects that provide students with an opportunity to develop cultural awareness and work on par-ticipatory Design Thinking and professional practice projects. These have normally taken place on the Derby campus but in 2020/21 the teaching delivery moved entirely to a virtual realm, due to the Covid-19 restrictions in the UK. This year, participants were tasked to propose products and services to improve student wellbeing in inner-city areas. This case study presents the results of this collaboration. The online Design Thinking project, undertaken by UK and Chinese students utilises the COIL framework (Collaborative Online International Learning). The goal of this ap-proach is for students to become independent critical thinkers, who use empathetic methodol-ogies to Design. Furthermore, it will present visual samples of students' work and present how online real-time interactive platforms facilitated their research and communication skills. The conclusion summarises what was learned from this way of working, together with suggestions of how this might feed into design pedagogy in the post-Covid era.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm10/03: Track | Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Xiang Xia, Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 

Professionalization of the discipline of interior architecture: Development of a ‘ready to use concept’ to intertwine research and education

Katelijn Quartier

Hasselt University, Belgium

Within the discipline of interior architecture, this paper takes the example of the specific domain of retail design to illustrate the interrelatedness between research and education at our faculty. We will elaborate on how we came to develop a ‘ready to use concept’, con-taining design guidelines and tools, that support students in making informed design deci-sions. As such, based on several workshops and an extensive literature review, eight tools were developed alongside 127 design guidelines. The tools and guidelines are inherently part of the retail design studio which is taught by a practitioner and an academic trained de-signer in order to be able to teach the mix of practical and academic knowledge as well as possible. We teach our students to be critical thinkers from the start and to apply scientific knowledge alongside their design skills while designing. Indeed, these students ultimately end up in the professional field and form a driving force for the professionalization process of interior architecture.



On the Signature Pedagogy of Photography Courses from the Perspective of Visual Communication Design

Yuanyuan Xu

University of Jinan, China, People's Republic of

As globalization deepens and cultural exchange becomes more frequent, the image has become an important channel of international cultural exchange and communication. As a form of light and shadow of contemporary art, it has its own advantages compared with literal communication. The application of lens language in image art and the expression of colour and emotion can bring a strong visual impact, and effectively arouse people's imagination and thoughts. Thus, the image has become a typical symbol of the arts in this era. How the courses of visual communication design adapt to the demands of this era is an important problem that design educators should think about. And the signature pedagogy provides the best solution to this problem.



Problems in the Reform of Design Teaching and Solutions :Taking Shandong University of Art & Design as An Example

Lei SUN

山东工艺美术学院,中华人民共和国

This article takes the teaching reform of the undergraduate program in Shandong University of Art & Design as a case for study. Through surveys with students, teachers, and employers, it finds out three core challenges faced by the design majors, and proposes three correspondent solutions, namely to use “aptitude-based teaching to cultivate talents”, “learning-assisted teaching to classify the teaching system”, and “learning-promoted teaching to innovate lectures”, which lead to a philosophy for the reform, where student’s development is regarded as the very foundation of all learning, and their achievement as the orientation of all work. This article analyses the common phenomena and problems faced by design education, raises possible solutions and a guiding philosophy, which have both theoretical and practical significance.

 
4:15pm - 4:30pmExercise 05: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participats will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

4:15pm - 4:30pmMilk Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University

come and join for a chit chat

4:15pm - 4:30pmMusic 03: Traditional Chinese music break
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

you may like to relax while listening traditional Chinese instruments

Ms. Wei Zhang will be your DJ

4:30pm - 5:30pm05/1w: Workshop Track | Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Arild Berg, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University
Session Chair: Fausto Orsi Medola, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP)

to see the workshop outline select the session's title

NOTE: this workshop is limited to 50 participants and Miro will be used to facilitate planned activities

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm

Collaborative Card-Based Learning Objective Design

Stefano Perna, Moritz Philip Recke

University of Naples Federico II Italy

The Learning Objective Design workshop introduces participants to a novel approach for collaboratively designing learning experiences, in particular addressing some of the typical processes of Instructional and Curriculum Design such as the design of Learning Objectives and Assessment strategies. The authors will introduce a Learning Objective Design Board as a practical tool to make the process of defining Learning Objectives and Assessment Strategies for any type of educational experience easier, more creative, collaborative, and even playful.

Outline of the workshop: 1. Introductory Presentation and Theoretical Background; 2. Presentation and instruction for the Collaborative Board in Miro; 3. Practical Exercises in small working groups; 4. Group presentations and discussion; 5. Wrap up.

In preparation for the workshop participants are kindly requested to create a free personal account on the Miro platform at www.miro.com (this step is not mandatory, participants can join even without an account, but having an account will result in a better experience).

Also, taking a quick tour of the main functionalities of the tool beforehand would make the practical part of the workshop easier and smoother for participants. Here's a quick and easy tutorial to get started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L1-0DOGHDY

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm07/1w: Workshop: Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Bryan Howell, Brigham Young University
Session Chair: Rik de Reuver, MODYN BV

to see the workshop outline, select the session's title

If you are not familiar with Miro platform please explore these videos on how to navigate, use sticky notes, use text frames, use icon tool, upload images, use pen tool

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pULLAEmhSho

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zbde_j3CbYo)

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm

Visualizing Your Knowledge and Connecting the Dots

Verena Natalie Paepcke-Hjeltness

Iowa State University, United States of America

This workshop focuses on knowledge exchange to foster collaboration across disciplines. Partici-pants will apply metaphors to visualize their research and projects using the online platform miro creating a virtual repository to start (or continue) conversations.

How can we transfer knowledge and connect across disciplines in academia in non-traditional ways? Although barriers to connect virtually are now lower than ever before, there is a plethora of knowledge and research that is not accessible, visible or discoverable to all researchers equally.

How can we connect academia to practice and vice versa? All too often pertinent research developed in academia doesn’t make its way to practice and on the other side businesses and industry are often too occupied meeting deadlines to either pursue their own research or to immerse in academic publications. This workshop aims to foster visual conversations to connect conference participants of diverse backgrounds to identify opportunities to collaborate with and learn from each other.

Materials:

> A computer and internet bandwidth that can handle being on Zoom and Miro.com at the same time

> Basic knowledge of miro.com: How to navigate, use sticky notes, use text frames, use icon tool, upload images, use pen tool

> Pen and paper

> A phone, tablet, or camera to upload sketches to Miro

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm08/2w: Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to see the workshop’s outline select the session's title

Please GET YOUR OB3 ACCOUNT before you join the workshop

Please follow this link https://ob3support.typeform.com/to/aq6dNn5B?typeform-source=learnxdesign.net

Once your account is set up, you will be able to get started with part 3 of the workshop, which is a 6-minute video tutorial on how to create and share media-rich documents https://use.ob3.io/#/623bb0f0-1ab3-11ec-a38a-000000000000/

A LAPTOP OR DESKTOP COMPUTER IS REQUIRED FOR THE WORKSHOP

For logistical and workshop design reasons it’s a requirement that you use a laptop or desktop computer. If you can only connect via phone or tablet you won’t be able to fully participate in the interactive aspects of the workshop

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm

Students and Teachers becoming Co-designers of Learning: A virtual learning space for creating, organising, and sharing media-rich documents

Gloria Gomez, Rodney Tamblyn

OceanBrowser Ltd, New Zealand

This interactive workshop will introduce a virtual personal learning environment for creating, organising, and sharing media-rich documents. This environment was developed to address issues in online education around student engagement and enabling academic staff to author their own teaching content. Its implementation was informed by design-based research undertaken from an interaction design perspective with bridging design prototypes. Its educational foundations are drawn from the fields of study skills for academic success, good visual design that facilitates metacognition, and networked learning for promoting connection between people. The implementation of a same interface for students and teachers to use has broadened participation in the creation of resources, facilitated opportunities for interesting individual and collaborative study activities, and administrative tasks have been reduced. Inspired by the feature design, these changes in study behaviour have transformed students into co-designers of learning, and teachers into facilitators of learning. These pedagogical innovations have mainly taken place in online medical and health science higher education programmes. However, these could potentially happen in contemporary design education.

GETTING YOUR OB3 ACCOUNT AHEAD OF TIME

Please follow this link https://ob3support.typeform.com/to/aq6dNn5B?typeform-source=learnxdesign.net

Once your account is set up, you will be able to get started with part 3 of the workshop, which is a 6-minute video tutorial on how to create and share media-rich documents https://use.ob3.io/#/623bb0f0-1ab3-11ec-a38a-000000000000/

A LAPTOP OR DESKTOP COMPUTER IS REQUIRED FOR THE WORKSHOP

For logistical and workshop design reasons it’s a requirement that you use a laptop or desktop computer. If you can only connect via phone or tablet you won’t be able to fully participate in the interactive aspects of the workshop

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm10/2w: Workshop: Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ziyuan Wang, CAFA

to see the workshop’s outline select the session title

 
4:30pm - 5:30pm

Workshop Proposal: Universal Design for Learning

Hsiao-Yun Chu

San Francisco State University, United States of America

Universal Design for Learning is a framework for accessible and inclusive teaching for people of all ability levels. It can help to make teaching and learning more accessible to people with mild to moderate learning disabilities as well as some level of physical disability by providing information and assessment in multiple formats.

> The goals of the workshop will be:

> Identify basic principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

> Understand how UDL can be used as a strategy for inclusive teaching

> Practice applying UDL principles to existing assignments/engagements

Technical Requirements & Materials:

• A computer and internet bandwidth that can handle being on zoom and checking other websites at the same time.

• Pen and paper for notetaking

• 5-20 participants in an online, synchronous learning environment

The workshop will consist of a narrated slide lecture over online platform (such as Zoom), interspersed with small group shares and working time, and will be synchronously taught. The focus will be on interactive learning and applications of new knowledge to participant’s existing teaching materials.

There will be a worksheet, readings, templates, and prompts available for group activities which will be shared digitally as link. Participants can either work on the digital files online or they can print them out prior to the workshop if they prefer to take notes on a piece of paper.

 
5:30pm - 5:45pmh02a: How was your day?
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Arild Berg, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University

meet with the Track Workshop: Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations chair

5:30pm - 5:45pmh02b: How was your day?
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University

meet with the Track Collaboration in Design Education chair

5:30pm - 5:45pmh02c: How was your day?
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Katja Thoring, Anhalt University

meet with the Track Design Learning Environments chair

5:30pm - 5:45pmh02d: How was your day?
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Juha Hartvik, Åbo Akademi University

meet with the Track Learning Though Materiality and Making chair

5:30pm - 5:45pmh02e: How was your day?
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yashar Kardar, Middle East Technical University

meet with the Track Futures of Design Education chair

Date: Sunday, 26/Sept/2021
12:30pm - 12:40pmd03: Welcome
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, SUAD/NUA
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning Wang & Hong Liang

Zoom
12:40pm - 1:00pmpl03: Plenary
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Liv Merete Nielsen, OsloMet
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Interpreters: Ning Wang & Hong Liang

 

Track 6: Learning Though Materiality and Making

Juha Hartvik1, Mia Porko-Hudd1, Ingvild Digranes2

1Åbo Akademi University, Finland; 2Western Norway University of Applied Sciences

In this track, the interest is directed towards children’s and young people’s opportunity to process materials in order to gain experience, knowledge and learning that can be useful at different stages of life, in study, professional and leisure activities. We welcome research presentations that look at materiality and making in both formal and informal learning environments.



Introduction: Futures of Design Education Beyond Time and Space

Yashar Kardar1, Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu1, Ayşegül Özçelik2, Sarper Seydioglu1

1Middle East Technical University, Turkey; 2Aalborg University, Denmark

The aim of this track was to explore possible alternatives in design education. When planning the overall scope of the track, we were interested in understanding how educators try to enable more accessible, inclusive, and adaptable design education models. We were particularly interested in understanding the affordances of time and space in design education and sustainable education models where members, independent of where they are and how they are, have the possibility to access education. The five submissions accepted from 23 authors approach the theme of this track from various perspectives, highlighting different aspects of approaches to other ways and directions of understanding, leading to change and transformation in design education.

 
1:00pm - 1:20pmAwards: the top submissions in Research Paper, Case Studies and Workshop Proposals categories
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Liv Merete Nielsen, OsloMet
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
1:30pm - 2:00pmBuilder's Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University

come and join for a chit chat

1:30pm - 2:00pmChinese Zodiac 02: Introduction of Chinese Zodiac Designs
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Peiyuan Zhang, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Shengnan Chang, Shandong University of Art & Design

It's interesting that the traditional China has 12 Chinese zodiacs,namely rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, Chinese dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. Those animal signs are a 12-year cycle used for dating the years. They represent a cyclical concept of time, rather than the linear concept of time. The Chinese lunar calendar is based on the cycles of the moon, and is constructed in a different fashion than the solar calendar. Every year is assigned an animal sign according to a repeating cycle from Rat to Pig.

Interpreter: Ning WANG

1:30pm - 2:00pmConfucius: Introduction to Confucius' philosophy
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: junfeng Ll, Shandong College of Arts & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

Confucius is famous for his philosophy because he made many wise sayings in ancient China that helped many people learn about nature, the world, and the human behavior. 

Interpreter: Hong Liang

1:30pm - 2:00pmDesign Education in China 03: Nanjing University of the Arts and in China general +Q&A
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Quanquan Zhao, Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Rui Guo, Shandong University of Art & Design

Meet with scholars from the Design Programmes in China to find out how is Design Education organised in Chinese Universities

1:30pm - 2:00pmExercise 06: Tai Chi Show by the Master Ms. Feng Yujuan who will be the demonstrator
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese internal martial art system, which combines profound principles, theories and martial art techniques. The slow, soft and continuously flowing movements appear mysterious on the surface. However, it is the cultivation of one's internal energy, mind and the physical body that make it so unique and challenging.

To generate relaxation, Tai Chi practice requires a deep level of concentration and a focused mind, thus allowing the mind to lead and guide the body's energy.

2:00pm - 3:00pm01/4 & 05/4: Track | Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education & Track | Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Fabio Andrés Téllez, Appalachian State University
Session Chair: Arild Berg, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University
Session Chair: Ting Yu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art &Design
Session Chair: Linlin Qiu, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

select the submissions’ title to access the submisions' abstracts and files

Interpreters: Ting YU and Linlin QIU

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

Nordic Life Design - a holistic design approach and attitude to life

Kirsten Bonde Sorensen

Danish School of Media and Journalism, Denmark

When discussing future education, we tend to focus discussions on defining future competen-cies on preparing students for an ever-changing labour market with job titles we cannot yet imag-ine. However, we often fail to recognise that our students, for years, have faced an extremely high degree of mental challenges, which indicates a need not only for new initiatives, but for rad-ical transformations in education: initiatives that represent a humanistic and holistic view, com-bining a broad focus on education, including new knowledge, with a clear focus on students' well-being, and vitality. This paper describes Nordic life design, a learning concept rooted in de-sign theory and practice that integrates knowledge from cognition, creativity, design, and brain science. The intention is to educate students not only for working life in a complex and ever-changing world, but for life in general. This paper details examples of incorporating Nordic life design in the higher education curriculum.



2:20pm - 2:40pm

A New Design Thinking Model Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy

Fan Wu, Yang Cheng Lin, Peng Lu

National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, China

A superior design thinking model can improve the quality of design education. In recent years, universities and design institutions already proposed many design thinking models around the world. Existing well-known design thinking models focus on cultivating students' creative thinking but ignore the product's inherent characteristics and users' demands. This paper proposes a step-by-step design thinking model based on Bloom's taxonomy, which is divided into lower-level and higher-level considerations. The lower-level consideration includes remembering, understanding, and applying, and the higher-level consideration includes analyzing, evaluating, and creating. The former integrates the function analysis method, form restriction method, and EGM to help students understand the target product and its users. The latter first evaluates any existing alternatives by using the AHP and then further redesigns the color and material of highchair to provide an optimum solution. A highchair was used as the example product for classroom teaching. Classroom teaching results showed that the new design thinking model can help students understand target products and user demands, thereby improving the concept design's feasibility.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

Challenges in Multidisciplinary Student Collaboration - Reflections on Student Peer Assessments in Design Education

Melis Örnekoğlu Selçuk, Marina Emmanouil, Jan Detand

Ghent University, Belgium

This paper reports on a study currently conducted in the scope of an Erasmus+ KA2 project on the subject of co-creation in design education. A case study was carried out on a third-year bachelor design engineering course (“Co-creation”) at which 48 students from different study disciplines, levels and countries worked together in groups to tackle societal challenges. This research aims to gain insights into students’ experiences and problems with regard to taking part in a multidisciplinary co-creation process by scrutinising student’s self-and peer-assessment reports. Findings refer to the essentials and challenges of multidisciplinary co-creation processes from a student perspective. In particular, soft skills were highlighted as fundamental skills while working with peers. Moreover, challenges in collaboration, specifically, in a remote learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, were noted. Recommendations were provided for design educators to ameliorate the multidisciplinary co-creation and learning environment in order to sufficiently prepare students for Industry 4.0.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm04/4: Track | Collaboration in Design Education
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Naz A G Z Börekçi, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Fatma Korkut, Middle East Technical Univ.

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 
2:00pm - 2:20pm

It’s the Cultural Difference That Makes the Difference: International Collaboration in Multidiscipline, Transcultural, Design Pedagogy

Clive David Hilton1, Muxing Gao2, Rong Wei2

1Coventry University, United Kingdom; 2Communication University of Zhejiang, China

For three years, the Communication University of Zhejiang (CUZ), China, and Coventry University (CU), UK, have been collaborating in an annual project that sees multidisciplinary, transcultural groups of undergraduate and postgraduate design students engaging in projects that help prepare them for future employment as culturally aware global designers. Its focus is on an enhanced under-standing of the importance of cultural dimensions, research led collaboration, and the need for em-pathetic, coordinated communication. In these accelerated, Collaborative Online International Learn-ing (COIL) projects, the students self-direct their actions to rapidly break down initial inhibitions in becoming effective, creative problem solvers who, by the project’s end, possess an acute apprecia-tion of the role that cultural perspectives and cultural difference play in the design process. This case study discusses the latest COIL 2021 project – the design of an item of medical equipment. It offers examples of the culturally orientated outcomes and gives insights from participating students. It con-cludes with explanations of how the COIL pedagogic paradigm is transforming design pedagogy, both at CUZ and CU.



2:20pm - 2:40pm

Cross-Cultural UX Pedagogy: A China–US Partnership

Ziqing Li1, Colin M. Gray1,2, Austin L. Toombs1,2, Kevin McDonald1, Lukas Marinovic1, Wei Liu2,1

1Purdue University, United States of America; 2Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China

The recent emergence of new undergraduate and graduate design programs with a focus specific to User Experience (UX) offers new opportunities to engage with the complexity of these educational practices. In this paper, we report on a series of ten interviews with students and faculty to describe cross-cultural connections between two UX-focused programs, one in China and one in the United States. Our study includes the perspectives of students who engaged in intercultural UX experiences, as well as the perspectives of the faculty who designed those student experiences through an intercultural partnership. We report on how each program was created, developed, and iterated upon, describing program goals and student experiences across both programs from student and instructor perspectives. We demonstrate the complexity of UX educational experiences on an international scale, concluding with opportunities for intercultural engagement and the potential for links among education, profession, culture, and pedagogy.



2:40pm - 3:00pm

Process Based Collaborations: Spanning Boundaries for Future Provocations

Rebekah Ison Radtke1, Hannah Dewhirst2, Joe Brewer3, Ingrid Schmidt4

1University of Kentucky, United States of America; 2University of Kentucky, United States of America; 3University of Kentucky, United States of America; 4University of Kentucky, United States of America

From the COVID-19 pandemic upending higher education, design education has been stretched, challenged, and reckoned with over the course of the past year. Against this backdrop, many have shifted their focus from in-person to online learning modalities. While understanding that is an accessible solution, we also recognize that is at a detriment to col-laboration and creation in traditional design education practices. Seeking to actively foster diverse ways of approaching interior design pedagogy, a collaborative team of faculty cre-ated a platform for multidisciplinary making to engage students in a semester-long work-shop series, entitled, Blender. Blender intends on creating inclusive learning landscapes im-buing making with optimism toward the future and the profession. Without question, this sense of collaboration and belonging created from Blender far exceeds the tangible out-comes of the physical output created by students. Faced with extended amounts of screen time, students readily engaged with the opportunity to reconnect with their peers, explore making in new robust ways, and create a community of making within their school, collaps-ing distances and stitching together new ideas.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm05/3: Co-creation of Interdisciplinary Design Educations
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Fausto Orsi Medola, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP)
Session Chair: Camilla Groth, University of South-Eastern Norway

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Co-creating a Cross-Material Silk and Porcelain Art Exhibition

Anne Solberg, Ellen Baskår

University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway

This paper resides in the field of artistic research and material-based art. The research issue is the co-creation of an art exhibition by two artist-researchers working with diametrically different materials. The research project is structured as a duo-ethnographic approach, with the voice of each participant present. Text and images are intertwined in the paper, both necessary for the communication of the project as a visual and material enterprise. Theoretical perspectives are the dialogue as a poly-vocal enterprise, embodied making and learning, and the role of materials in the art-making. The communication throughout the project was not vocal only, but visual and material. The planned art exhibition proved to be crucial for the direction of development of the participants' personal aesthetic expressions. The co-creation and collaboration process was a vital force throughout the project, enhancing awareness of the other and each artist learning from the other. It forced the artists to give the other and the public access to personal artistic strife and struggle, thus enhancing the transparency that is crucial for a learning process and required in a research project.



Research on the Construction of Curriculum system of Design Education under the concept of STEAM

Han Shi1, Feng Xue1, Jing Pei2, Yijing Li1, Zhihang Song1, Chunli Chunli1

1Zhengzhou University of Light Industry. People's Republic of China.; 2Jingdezhen Ceramic University. People's Republic of China.

Both design education and STEAM education pay attention to the cultivation of students' innovative consciousness and practical ability, and they are highly consistent in teaching objectives and educational ideas. Based on the analysis of the relevant educational practice, the current research situation and the basic concepts of design education, this paper puts forward the curriculum design principles of curriculum content and curriculum evaluation for the design education integrated with STEAM. This paper constructs the teaching link of design education under the concept of STEAM from three aspects: teachers' activities, teaching links and students' activities. finally, it discusses the new teaching methods of design education and the future development of design education.



Essential Medications: a co-created learning and design opportunity

KM Sellen1, N Persaud2, S Werle1, M Al Bess1, N Goso1, R Hetu1, H Soliman1, A Bernado1, N Umali2

1OCAD U, Canada; 2Unity Health Toronto

The purpose of the Essential Medications project was to design the packaging and branding for CLEAN Meds (Carefully Selected and Easily Accessible at No Charge Medicines), together with a team of doctors, pharmacists, and patients. To design for free essential medications we used a public health design lens, a combination of evidence-based research and lived-experience. The project was realized as a co-created experiential learning opportunity through an undergraduate advertising and packaging studio class, and project based learning opportunity. The Essential Medication project is a collaboration between the Community Guidance Panel of the CLEAN Meds project and team, at MAP Centre for Urban Solutions, at Unity Health and the Health Design Studio at OCAD University with undergraduate programs in graphic design and advertising. Students worked closely with all stakeholders to design a look and tone for the project together with a packaging design, that appealed aesthetically, and also paid close attention to issues of implementation, accessibility, stigma, and trust. This case study discusses the structuring of the project and the insights gained from structuring and supporting this co-created learning opportunity as well as insights on adjustments for COVID 19.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm08/4: Track | Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Katja Thoring, Anhalt University
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University
Session Chair: Shan Gao, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 

The intellectual diet in pastoral spaces of activity in digital design education

Andreas Lanig

DIPLOMA Hochschule

During lockdown, students are excluded from the inspiring learning space of the university. Students receive a different "intellectual diet" here than they do in the university. In the studio learning of the traditional face-to-face university, the artistic and cognitive impulses are curated with a design pedagogical concept. This concept contains visual, intellectual and social impulses. This concept did not exist in the previous three semesters - it was left to the respective family and home environment of the students during the lockdown. While this is generally the case for distance learning students, it was exacerbated during the lockdown.

Students operate in remote-learning mode via primarily digital channels. For the case study presented here, the question of the holistic nature of these stimuli presents itself. The adjective "pastoral", for example, is to be understood as the hypothesis that, over the course of the past two semesters, in addition to subject-related teaching, teachers were partly responsible for the aesthetic and – this remains to be demonstrated – the pastoral dimensions of a degree course in design.

On the basis of in-depth interviews, the case study develops categories of teaching activity within digital spaces of action to which students attribute a particular degree of effectiveness. The feedback was evaluated by means of a written survey and in-depth interviews with students of online programmes at the bachelor's and master's level.



Rethinking experiential learning in Design education: the shift of the Systemic Design course to a multimodal online learning environment

Alessandro Campanella, Eliana Ferrulli, Silvia Barbero

Politecnico di Torino, Italy

The outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic has generated serious consequences on the higher ed-ucation sector, highlighting its existing vulnerabilities and forcing it to face complex challenges. However, the current situation can also be seen as an opportunity to deeply rethink the learning activities and the environments in which they are carried out, whether online or in the class-room, designing long-term innovation plans that extends beyond the end of the crisis. The paper aims to explore the process of redesigning an experiential and social learning course for an online learning modality. The reported case study, the Systemic Design course held in the M. Sc. in Systemic Design at Politecnico di Torino (Italy), was analysed in order to identify and address its main challenges, related to the redefinition of its learning activities and the improvement of the interaction and cooperation between the different actors in a context of social distancing. The project led to the adoption of new strategies and tools, tested on the course itself.



Materiality of Space and Time in the Virtual Design Studio

Ruth M. Neubauer, Christoph H. Wecht

New Design University, Austria

Digital structures as well as time can be described as crucial material affordances of the virtual design studio space. We question the notion that digital spaces are inherently immaterial and intangible. We challenge the concept of presence and flexibility in the context of the virtual space, and claim that digital infrastructures can be as materially inflexible as physical worlds. Simultaneously we argue for the potential of understanding virtual spaces beyond binary conceptions of presence/absence. We use concepts of practice and materiality to analyse virtual spaces as distributed spatiotemporal structures that can be designed to afford flexibility. We are interested in the design of spatiotemporal spaces that on the one hand provide flexible learning environments and that teach on the other hand this understanding of materiality of virtual structures to its participants.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm09/1: Track | Futures of Design Education
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Sarper Seydioğlu, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Doing research in design: inquiry of the key competences needed to integrate research in design practice.

Sandra Dittenberger1, Stefan Moritsch1, Agnes Raschauer2, Julia Pintsuk-Christof1

1New Design University, Austria; 2University of Vienna, Austria

Over the last decades, design research and design practice have become intertwined in a new way and design study programmes have to react to these changes, providing students with the ability to link their creative practice with scientific research. Design education has to develop solutions for this new demand and support these profound changes of the discipline itself by addressing these issues from the very beginning of design education on, the BA-level. In order to better understand what the problems are when carrying out research in design, this paper aims to contribute to the topic of the integration of research in design practice by outlining results from a mixed-methods case study conducted at New Design University/Austria. In this study, required main competencies on the part of students in every phase of a holistic design process, which includes research as well as practice, were identified and quantitatively assessed by the students themselves and their teachers, followed by problem-centred interviews with students.



Learning Remotely through Diversity and Social Awareness. The Grand Challenge approach to tackle societal issues through diversity and creative thinking

Laura Ferrarello, Rute Pereira Crespo Fiadeiro, Ashley Hall, Fernando Galdon, Paul Anderson, Clive Grinyer, John Stevens, Chang Hee Lee

Royal College of Art, United Kingdom

Covid-19 has brought unprecedented and unthinkable transformations that have drawn uncertainty across the world, in particular regarding the strategies that could most effectively help the global population undertake substantial behavioural changes. To reflect and generate a response to the societal flaws in safety procedures the pandemic has exposed politics, communications, logistics and global economies the Royal College of Art School of Design launched a Grand Challenge on Design for Safety which enquired the design capacity to draw behavioural propositions that leverage diversity, creativity and, generally, attitudes for addressing societal challenges proactively. This was explored by engaging a community of multidisciplinary and multicultural postgraduate designers, working remotely away from the studios, to think beyond solutions and imagine unthinkable ways to innovate. This diverse community of designers and thinkers became an asset for developing design strategies that, mirroring the initial hypothesis, generate knowledge for design to learn from the dramatic changes the world has experienced through the pandemic to inform more sustainable and equitable futures.



From Eyes to Ears How to deal with the acoustic element “voice” as a visual designer

Daniela Hensel, Birgit Bauer, Stefanie Voß

University of Applied Sciences HTW Berlin, Germany

As part of the ‘software evolution’ (Mens, 2008), acoustic rather than visual interfaces are

increasingly developing into the decisive contact point in the interaction between the product or service and the user. Voices, ‘VUI’s, play an important role the design of communication, yet communication designers are not yet firmly established in this field and, for example, the process of voice selection is often described as a particular hurdle especially when the selection needs to align with strategic parameters of a brand. This raises several questions: What role can communication designers play in the future in the complex field of designing with voice? What are the specific challenges (and opportunities) for designers in this field? And how can design education respond?

This case study focuses on a project course with communication design students that addressed the topic ‘designing with voice’. It explores the element of voice in a design educational setting in terms of five aspects: module concept, sequence of activities, findings

and evaluation, and positioning communication designers in the context of VUI.

 
2:00pm - 3:00pm10/4: Track | Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ziyuan Wang, CAFA
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 

What Have You Learned? An experimental approach in teaching Human Factors in Design to undergraduate ID students

Selen Sarıel

Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey

This case study presents an in-class exercise as a way to learn about the course learning outcomes for a Human Factors in Design course carried out with undergraduate level industrial design students in the 2020-2021 academic year. The paper introduces the course content, comprised of the theoretical knowledge-sharing part, sample assignments and in-class exercises to define the context of the study. Watching the same short movie at the beginning and the end of the learning period, students responded to open-ended questions that encouraged them to think about how their perception had changed towards the content of the movie and to reflect on their take-aways from the course. Thematic analysis of the student responses helped identify the shared patterns in which students had developed an understanding of the human factors in design. A survey in the form of an in-class exercise also aimed to help students promptly be aware of the course outcomes to sustain their practices for upcoming design challenges.



Research on the Green Design Course in Industrial Design

Lu-Ting Xia, Chun-Heng Ho, Xing-min Lin

National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

While improving people's living standards, the development and progress of science and technology have come with a series of challenges, such as resource depletion, environmental pollution, species extinction, and climate change resulting from global warming. As a demand for sustainable development in society, "Green Design" is expected to continue to be the focus of industrial design education in the 21st century. In this pa-per, 212 students from Zhejiang Gongshang University were selected as objects to car-ry out relevant research through experimental design. As indicated by the results, 1. Green design course exerts a significantly different influence on environmental percep-tion in the industrial design discipline. 2. Nature experience has a significantly different influence on environmental perception. 3. Industrial design education and nature expe-rience impose a significantly different influence on the improvement of environmental perception. Suggestions were made to provide students with a key made of green de-sign through nature experience activities, with a view to encouraging them to step into the world of nature of truth, goodness and beauty and enhancing their awareness of the environment.



Cultivate Leadership Contagion. A Speculative Grounded Theory Knowledge for Future Change Agents.

Francesco Galli1, Gerry Derksen2, Zhabiz Shafieyoun2

1IULM University, Italy; 2Winthrop University, USA

“Changing paradigma” can be defined as a sudden outbreak in the accepted social norm, a fundamental change in the way of thinking and a change of paradigm. Society and culture are two strongly intertwined realities. Every society is, therefore, the bearer of its own legacy and contagious. Today’s Cultural and Creative Industries’ education market is facing a rapidly mutating academic scenario.

The revolutionary change of the society and the increasingly sense of Cultural and disciplinary “contagious” request our universities to rethink their philosophies towards critical and creative education. In what ways is the industry’s uncertain future challenging the traditional pedagogy? In what forms could the creative leader curriculum be evolved to prepare future talents for this new paradigm? ( V.U.C.A Volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity )

By exploring one particular international “conversation in action", this paper investigates the implementation practice of embedding adaptive leadership in the internationalised creative education. The researchers explain the mutated role of the creative educator from the ‘instructor,’ who delivers the educational content to the students, to the ‘coach,’ who constructs the learning process for the future expert designers.

In conclusion, the authors indicate that future thinking for creative leadership needs to consider three factors: firstly, leadership thinking is not necessarily accessible for all expert designers; secondly, leadership signifies projecting the potentiality of taking responsibilities and develop critical thinking; lastly, the study implies that when facing the uncertainty of the organizational system, creative leaders should anticipate and induce, rather than simply react to the changing following the contagious.

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmExercise 07: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participates will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

3:00pm - 3:15pmMusic 04: Traditional Chinese music break
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

you may like to relax while listening traditional Chinese instruments

Ms. Wei Zhang will be your DJ

3:00pm - 3:15pmRum Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University
Session Chair: Ayşegül Özçelik, Aalborg University

come and join for a chit chat

3:15pm - 4:15pm01/2w: Workshop: Design Thinking to Improve Creative Problem-solving: From Kindergarten to Higher Education
Virtual location: Usuli
Session Chair: Jeannette LaFors, Kelefors Consulting
Session Chair: Natalia Allende, Natalia Allende Studio

NOTE: the workshop is limited to 30 participants
to see the workshop's outline select the session's title

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

Workshop: How to Design to Improve Life: The Compass, a problem-solving tool by The Index Project

Catalina Cortes1, Alesandro Mariano2

1Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile; 2The Index Project

Education at every level, faces new challenges due to the growing globalization, dynamism of markets, the development of technology, and high levels of complexity in various systems. Educators need to prepare students to work and thrive in an unknown future scenario. The current context derived from the Covid-19 pandemic has abruptly modified what we knew as “the education system” globally. If before education was located mainly in the classroom, today the hybrid modality makes educational dynamics more complex and must focus on the development of critical thinking skills to foster autonomy and problem-solving abilities in students. Future workers will need to lead sustainable innovation by considering the long-term implications of their design solutions in every field. This workshop is an introduction to the Compass® methodology developed by The Index Project®. The Compass is a flexible frame of action to organize, structure, and manage problem-solving processes. The difference between this method and other design thinking models is its focus on maintaining coherence between FORM, IMPACT, and CONTEXT to evaluate solutions in a holistic and sustainable way with the purpose of improving people’s lives.

*Note that for this workshop we will be using Zoom and Miro. You don't need to have a personal Miro account to participate.

Please review the following document and video before the workshop session:

video of Compass® methodology: https://vimeo.com/42259136

Teacher´s Guide: https://issuu.com/index/docs/edu_uguide02_indhold_eng_print

You don't need to bring any other materials.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm03/2w: Alternative Problem Framing in Design Education
Virtual location: Ewei
Session Chair: Lesley-Ann Noel, North Carolina State University
Session Chair: Sucharita Beniwal, National Institute of Design

to see the workshop's outline select the session's title

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

Beyond Problem-Solving: Re-Imagining Workshop Materials

Allison Edwards, Hannah Korsmeyer

Monash University, Australia

Design has a rich history of being framed as a problem-solving activity (Simon, 1995). However, this does not fully capture the plurality of diverse practices designers use to engage with complex challenges in creative ways. As we seek to design more joyful and affirming workshops for diverse audiences, we can also re-imagine the roles played by the co-design materials we select or create, beyond functioning as tools for problem-solving. This workshop introduces a framework that leverages the potentially playful and pedagogically rich co-facilitation performed by these materials, and encourages participants to re-image the role materials play in their own participatory practices.


Please note: We will be using Zoom and Miro, participants are not required to have a personal account. Participants in this workshop are asked to come prepared with an image of materials they use in their practices that they would be happy to share and discuss with the group.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm06/1: Learning Through Materiality and Making
Virtual location: Anhui
Session Chair: Ingvild Digranes, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 
3:15pm - 3:35pm

Thinking with Card - Tactile and Making-Based Resources for Active Remote Learning in STEM Subjects

Benjamin Hughes

Beijing Institute of Technology, China, People's Republic of

Thinking with Card is an online resource that encourages active learning through making activities linked to subjects within core STEM curricula. The (bilingual) resources are aimed at Key Stage 2 and 3 students (UK) and Middle School students (China) (approx age 7-14). The project was launched in July 2020 in response to the pandemic and corresponding need for stimulating activities suitable for home and remote learning. The free downloadable models can be printed and constructed using simple tools and have shown to help students understand complex concepts which are difficult to grasp from textbooks or even demonstrations (e.g. the relationship between magnetism and electricity, or the function of a four-stroke engine). The physical nature of these resources is also helpful for those looking for active learning approaches that are more inclusive in relation to dyslexia, where visual thinking and mechanical skills come more naturally.The development of future card models has been built into a course module for industrial design students that promotes and enhances prototyping skills.



3:35pm - 3:55pm

Imaginary Museums: A New Approach to the Learning and Assessment of Design History

Benjamin Hughes, Ke Jiang

International Design Centre, School of Design and Art, Beijing Institute of Technology, China, People's Republic of

This paper outlines an approach taken to re-establish the status, significance and implementation of the design history component of a practice-based undergraduate design course in China. The format for delivery and assessment were found to have stagnated into a curriculum module widely regarded as of peripheral interest. A project was undertaken to revise not only the scope of teaching material so that it was more appropriate for remote learning, but also the mode of assessment. The traditional lecture format was replaced in part by an online course, augmented by widely available video and texts. In-person teaching was switched to seminar discussion and support of students own research. In encouraging students to undertake research outside of the presented material, the course has been able to shift the focus from the regurgitation of information to that of a more authentic enquiry. Essay submission has been replaced by a piece of design work through which the research may be presented to a new audience.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm07/2wb Workshop: Sketching & Drawing Education and Knowledge
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Bryan Howell, Brigham Young University
Session Chair: JanWillem Hoftijzer, Delft Univ. of Technology

to see the workshop's outline, select the session's title

NOTE: this is the second part of the workshop, the first part is schedule here

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm

New Immersive Workflows for Design and Production (session 1 of 2)

Mauricio Novoa1, Wenwen Zhang2, Jose Manuel Rodriguez Diaz3, Bryan Howell4, Jan Willem Hoftijzer3

1Western Sydney; 2University of Canterbury; 3Technical University of Delft; 4Brigham Young University, United States of America

Today, there is a lot of hype about new technologies such as immersive virtual reality (VR). After more than five decades, the unfulfilled prophecy that VR would be available to everybody seems to be nearby. These development raises the need to find out how is that design and its education will be influenced by technological change and how they can also benefit from it. The aim of this workshop is to collaborate, share and discuss how traditional and new means for ideation, sketching, simulation, and production can form a better design workflow. The participants will be invited to contribute analogue or digital concepts (e.g., pen and paper, tablet). A selection of sketches will be transferred to a virtual reality program and developed into a 3D simulation for later 3D printing. The team of presenters will work in flexible and distributed locations in Australia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, and the United States of America. Participants will be invited to share their own circumstances,

views, and aspirations in relation to the implementation and potential of new technology in

their own design education.

Keywords: design education, distributed collaboration, interaction design, user experience, virtual reality

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm08/5: Track | Design Learning Environments
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Katja Thoring, Anhalt University
Session Chair: Nicole Lotz, The Open University

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

InterpretersShan GAO and Xingfu WANG

 

Hybrid Spaces teaching for “Chinese Traditional costume craft”

Shunhua Luo, Jingrui Yang, Chunhong Fan

Shandong University of Art & Design, China, People's Republic of

The general teaching mode for practical courses of design education was demonstration teaching by face-to-face and step-by-step. This exploration perhaps could provide a teaching method as a reference for practical courses in other design contents. An improved teaching mode about Chinese traditional costume crafts focusing on hybrid spaces including online teaching platforms, digital technology, and virtual interactive learning was introduced. Lu embroidery as the teaching object was shown in this case study. Online teaching platforms and interactive learning system of crafts based on virtual technology were employed, and students were required to study embroidery knowledge and crafts by self-learning at pre-class activities. Intangible cultural heritage inheritors and teachers at physical space discussed with students face to face and guided students to carry out innovative designs. This case study demonstrated that hybrid spaces for design education could improve the ability of students’ self-learning and teaching efficiency.



Critique Assemblages in Response to Emergency Hybrid Studio Pedagogy

Christopher Wolford, Yue Zhao, Shantanu Kashyap, Colin M. Gray

Purdue University, United States of America

Studio education focuses on active learning and assessment that is embedded in students’ exploration of ill-structured problems. Critique is a central component of this experience, providing a means of sensemaking, assessment, and socialization. These critique sessions encompass multiple types of interactions among students and instructors at multiple levels of formality. In most design programs, these practices have been situated in a physical studio environment—until they were disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a group of educators and design students, we used this disruption as an opportunity to reimagine means of critique engagement. In this paper, we document the creation, piloting, and evaluation of new critique assemblages—each of which bring together a group of technology tools, means and norms of engagement, and channels of participation. We report both on the extension of existing critique types such as desk crits, group crits, and formal presentation crits, describing both the instructional goals of the new critique assemblages and the students’ experience of these assemblages. Building on these outcomes, we reflect upon opportunities to engage with new hybrid critique approaches once residential instruction can resume, and identify patterns of socialization and wellbeing that have emerged through these assemblages that foster critical reflection on studio practices.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm09/2: Track | Futures of Design Education
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Yashar Kardar, Middle East Technical University
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

 

Social Implementation of Design Workshops Output -Research on factors leading to a project successful introduction and application

Yanfang ZHANG1, Christian CRUZ2, Shinichiro ITO3, Tokushu INAMURA1

1Kyushu University, Faculty of Design, Japan; 2Yamaguchi University, Faculty of Global and Science Studies, Japan; 3Kyoto Sangyo University, Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Japan

This paper is a summary of the analyzed experiences collected from ‘social implementation projects’ which started as participatory design workshops. Since there is very little research done on social implementation methods based on these kinds of workshops outcome, this study aims to review the projects that were successfully implemented and clarify the factors leading to their successful social realization. Using a qualitative approach, archival data was reviewed and project leaders were interviewed, which shed light over the characteristics necessary for the successful enactment of the ideas sprung from the workshops. This study shows there are four essential attributes that a workshop output must posses in order to be socially implemented: A stake-holding oriented system, a collaborative environment, a strong bond between local issues and external resources, and a solid foundation of flexible design thinking methods.



Ten scenarios for the future of design education A critical literature review and reflection to map scenarios on a macro, meso, and micro level.

Lore Brosens1,2, Johanna Renny Octavia3, Annelies Raes4,5, Marina Emmanouil1,2

1Department of Industrial Systems Engineering and Product Design, Ghent University, Kortrijk, Belgium; 2Design.Nexus, Ghent University, Kortrijk, Belgium; 3Department of Industrial Engineering, Parahyangan Catholic University, Bandung, Indonesia; 4KU Leuven, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Centre for Instruc-tional Psychology & Technology, Belgium; 5KU Leuven, imec research group itec, Kortrijk, Belgium

There is a shared understanding that design educations’ conventional approaches need to be challenged, however, most studies only present research on a micro level, that is, discusses innovations on a single course and neglect a holistic and strategic revision of design education including of the meso and macro levels. Therefore, this study adds to the discussion by presenting a critical literature review that reflects on previously con-ducted systematic reviews and focus groups. The outcome of this procedure are ten scenarios that show possibilities for the future of design education mapped on a mac-ro, meso, and micro framework. It was found that design education in the future could (and should) incorporate collaborations and awareness on a macro level; question con-ventional university structures; and un-tangle and clarify students’ knowledge acquisi-tion processes. By presenting these scenarios the authors hope to contribute to the discussion on what the future of design education should entail.



Research on the Constituency of the Advisory Committee of Chinese Design Schools from a Sustainable Perspective

Fan CHEN, Lin LI, Jing-Yi YANG

Tongji University, China, People's Republic of

The design and education fields have been starting to pay attention to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) ever since 2019, and the following two events would affirm this tendency. Firstly, the committee of the iF Design Award triggered to adopt SDGs as their evaluation standard. Secondly, the Times Higher Education Impact Rankings began to as-sess the performance of 768 universities from 85 countries against SDGs. This reflect a broader consideration towards sustainability has been establishing. Based on the context, this study inquired about the sustainable quality of nine educational institutions of design in China under an advisory committee perspective, which has worked to suggest the future direction of the institution. The researchers made use of comparative methodology to ex-plore each objects’ developing trend and their specialties. After qualitative and quantitative analysis, the researchers have found the limitations involving the diversity, the scale, and the sustainability of these objects, then recommended the corresponding suggestions ex-pecting to create an environment, which would lead design education to a more sustainable future.

 
3:15pm - 4:15pm10/5: Track | Design Educators as Change Agents
Virtual location: Liaoning
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts
Session Chair: Ziyuan Wang, CAFA

to access submissions’ abstracts and files please select the session's title

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

 

Framing research assistants’ pedagogical roles in design studio courses: Initial findings

Koray Gelmez1, Pelin Efilti1, Enver Tatlısu1, Tuğçe Ecem Tüfek2, Onur Yılmaz1

1Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; 2Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey

Participants of a design studio regardless of the titles and responsibilities apparently influence both teaching and learning processes. Even though it is possible to find several studies focusing on design teachers and design students, scholars have been silent to investigate the teaching activities of research/teaching assistants in a design studio course context. This study is an attempt to understand and frame the perceived pedagogical roles of research assistants in design studio courses. In this sense, we designed a survey addressing in-studio roles and responsibilities, the relations with the instructors, the effects on the student learning process, the factors shaping pedagogical roles, and the administrative responsibilities. As a result, we consider research/teaching assistants as change agents with their intermediary roles and practical impacts in design studio courses.



Research on china's industrial design education from the perspective of national policy

Yun FAN1, Jianglong YU2, Yang ZHANG3, Erik BOHEMIA4

1Shandong University of Art and Design, Design Education Research Center; 2Shandong University of Art and Design; 3Nanjing University of the Arts,Industrial Design College; 4Oslo Metropolitan University

An increasing number of countries including China have incorporated industrial design development into their national development strategies. However, China hasn’t real-ized the process of industrial revolution in a real sense yet for most of its industrial manufacturing industry lacks innovation ability and still relies on cheap labour to get profits. In this context, industrial design has become the main force to promote Chi-na’s industrial structure adjustment and innovative talents are the core driving force; government plays a vital role in the national education development orientation and talent training. This paper takes the development of Chinese industrial design educa-tion in colleges and universities from 2014 to 2019 as an example and analyzes the in-fluence of national policy on industrial design education. It mainly adopts literature analysis and data statistics methods to compare the development process, profession-al ranking, the talent training scheme and curriculum in colleges and universities. The purpose is to provide development direction and reference for colleges and universi-ties with industrial design majors.

 
4:15pm - 4:30pmExercise 08: Master Ms. Feng Yujuan will demonstrate the traditional stretching exercise: Baduanjin
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Jianglong Yu, Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design

This traditional Chinese exercise has been in existence for more than eight hundred years.  Because of its effectiveness for keeping fit, it was accepted by Shaolin monks as one of the basic entering level exercises for Shaolin Kunfu. The Eight-Section Brocade is an ideal life time exercise for most people. It is especially recommended for people who work at desks every day. Regular practice of this exercise can strengthen one's internal organs as well as one's muscles and tendons.

The participants will learn 8 movements

Interpreters: Ning WANG and Hong LIANG

4:15pm - 4:30pmMusic 05: Traditional Chinese music break
Virtual location: I-hsien
Session Chair: Wei Zhang, Shandong University of Art&Design

you may like to relax while listening traditional Chinese instruments

Ms. Wei Zhang will be your DJ

4:15pm - 4:30pmWhite Tea: Unmoderated Chat Room -- share your favourite tea recipe...
Virtual location: Nanzhangcheng
Session Chair: Lilyana Yazirlıoğlu, TED University
Session Chair: Yashar Kardar, Middle East Technical University

come and join for a chit chat

4:30pm - 5:10pmReflections: 10th Anniversary of the International Conference for Design Education Researchers
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Eva Lutnæs, Oslo Metropolitan University
Session Chair: Yang Zhang, Shandong University of Art and Design; Nanjing University of the Arts

Reflecting on the past decade of Design Education Research

Paris 2011 | Researching Design Education

Erik Bohemia


Oslo 2013 | Design Learning for Tomorrow

Liv Merete Nielsen


Chicago 2015 | Education and Design to Enlighten a Citizenry

Robin Vande Zande


London 2017 | The Allure of the Digital

Derek Jones


Ankara 2019 | Insider Knowledge Reflections on the Fifth International Conference for Design Education Researchers

Naz A.G.Z. Börekçi, Fatma Korkut, Dalsu Özgen Koçyıldırım


Jinan 2021 | Engaging with Challenges in Design Education

Derek Jones, Jianglong Yu and Naz A G Z Börekçi

5:10pm - 5:20pmFarewell
Virtual location: Ericuo
Session Chair: Erik Bohemia, SUAD / OsloMet
Session Chair: Liv Merete Nielsen, OsloMet
Session Chair: Ning Wang, Interpreter/Shandong University of Art and Design
Session Chair: Hong Liang, Interpreter/ Shandong University of Art & Design

Liv Merete NielsenDRS LxD.2021 International Academic Organising Committee Chair

Inerpreters: Ning Wang and Hong Liang

5:20pm - 5:40pmEvolution: Random Encounters
Virtual location: Ericuo

 
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