Conference Agenda

The conference agenda provides an overview and details of sessions. In order to view sessions on a specific day or for a certain room, please select an appropriate date or room link. You may also select a session to explore available abstracts and download papers and presentations.

 
Session Overview
Session
06-06: Creating the Data to Support Urban Land Management
Time:
Wednesday, 22/Mar/2017:
10:30am - 12:00pm

Session Chair: Peter Baumann, Jacobs U | rasdaman, Germany
Location: MC C1-100

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Presentations

Can We Talk About Smart Cities Without a Proper Land Management System In Place?

Miguel Mendoza

Thomson Reuters.

Can we talk about Smart Cities without a proper Land Management System in place?

“Today, 54 per cent of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a proportion that is expected to increase to 66 per cent by 2050. Projections show that urbanization combined with the overall growth of the world’s population could add another 2.5 billion people to urban populations by 2050, with close to 90 percent of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa, according to a new United Nations report launched today.” (2014 revision of the World Urbanization Prospects by UN DESA)

“Managing urban areas has become one of the most important development challenges of the 21st century. Our success or failure in building sustainable cities will be a major factor in the success of the post-2015 UN development agenda,” (John Wilmoth, Director of UN DESA’s Population Division)

For me it´s very simple, we can´t talk about “Smart Cities” without talk about “Smart Cadastre” and “Smart Public Registry” or “Smart Land Management Systems”.



Spatial Information for Developed and Developing Smart Cities

George Percivall, Trevor Taylor, Denise McKenzie

The Open Geospatial Consortium

Urban population accounts for more than half of the world’s population (World Health Organization). By 2030, this is expected to rise to 60%, with 95% of growth occurring in the developing world (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), 2015, Goal 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable), with a substantial proportion living in poverty in Megacities. High density cities can realize efficiency gains by making better use of spatial information. Geospatial information is often difficult to find, share, fuse, analyse and publish. Open standards are critical to enabling cities to ensure the data is made available to produce information that is actionable and fit for purpose and will work well with existing and emerging technologies. Maximizing the use of the data, selecting an appropriate level of openness and building an enabling infrastructure, supports improved governance.

The OGC has developed a Smart Cities Spatial Information Framework to provide guidance on how ICT location standards for City Models, Sensors, and Mobile enable efficient information management to support informed decisions for such scenarios as coastal flooding, 3D city modelling and Public Security. This talk will present the framework using examples from Dhaka, Bangladesh, the City of Berlin and other cities.



A New Spatial Indicator To Identify Ghettos

Emilio Matuk1, Luis Triveno2

1Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú; 2World Bank

From a statistical point of view, there are many reports that portrait similarities or differences between areas inside a city. This paper tries to highlight the importance of spatial correlation between observations in order to have a confidence interval of any assertion related to characteristics of a city. In particular, with information available from a standard population and housing census associated to block cartography, we present an attempt to locate ghettos based on characteristics extracted from census data. We believe this methodology will allow governments or NGOs to focus in city areas where needs are more acute.