Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Session C3 3: Confronting Rohingya Genocide with New Technology
Time:
Wednesday, 21/July/2021:
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Session Chair: Elisenda Calvet Martinez, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
Location: Room 3

Presentations

Confronting Rohingya Genocide with New Technology

Chair(s): Mofidul Hoque (Liberation War Museum, Bangladesh, People's Republic of)

Ever since the sudden influx of Rohingya victims of Genocidal brutalities to Bangladesh the global community has acted in many different ways. While the Security Council has failed to react appropriately the process of justice and accountability has taken its own course. Both ICJ and ICC has taken up the case in their respective court. But the Covid-19 pandemic has changed the reality and many activities among and with the Rohingya community has come to a standstill. One the other hand digital platform and new technology has created new opportunities to address the issue of confronting ongoing genocide. New technology has to play more effective role in various aspects such as documentation of atrocity crimes and projecting the plight of the victims. Digital communication has opened new possibilities and international community must take advantage of that. The panelists will address the issue from various perspectives to enhance the role of new technology in confronting Genocide.

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

Art and Genocide: Creating Digital Platform

Mofidul Hoque
Liberation War Museum

Even since Bangladesh hosted more than 700,000 Rohingya victims of genocide the local people extended various support to the refugee community. This has found reflection in various artistic endeavour to uphold the victims suffering, highlight the pattern of atrocities and bring hope to the hopeless people. The artistic community of Bangladesh reacted in many ways including painting, sculpture, literature, theatre, film-making, photographs etc. They also engaged with the victim community encouraging them to come up with their own artistic renderation. Such efforts have given rise to a wealth of artistic treasure. Since last one year with the spread of Covid-19 pandemic the artistic activities has come to a standstill. On the other hand the digital platform and social media has become more active and showed new possibilities. How that new opportunity can be exploited to promote art against genocide is the challenge of the day. The paper will highlight the role of art and the way digital communication can enhance that role to confront Genocide.

 

Educating Rohingya Children: Use of Digital Technology

Prethee Majbahin
Liberation War Museum

Conflicts, unrest political environment and poverty have contributed to the growing flow of refugees around the world, particularly from the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Most recently, Bangladesh has been overwhelmed by the Rohingyas since violence erupted in Buddhist- dominated Myanmar’s Rakhine state. Millions of Rohingyas have fled from their country to Bangladesh. Conditions are worsening in the border town of Cox’s Bazar where the influx has imposed additional pressure on Rohingya camps that are already overwhelmed with people from earlier waves of refugees. Though the Rohingyas are expected to return back to Myanmar as early as possible, the Government of Bangladesh with support of humanitarian partners is trying to support the Rohingya refugees by allowing them access to basic services, including education. This research aims to provide an overview of education system in Rohingya camps by examining present situation of the schools in Rohingya refugee camps and analyze the use of digital technology in education. Moreover, this study will shed light on the challenges prevailing in Rohingya education system, risk factors of dropouts of Rohingya children and develop a constructive framework that might be helpful to ensure better education for the Rohingya refugees.

 

Quilt of Memory and Hope: Digital Exhibition of AJAR and LWM

Pia Conradsen1, Nasrin Akter2
1AJAR, 2Liberation War Museum

The Rohingya are very likely to be involved in decades of struggle for the fulfillment of their rights. The fight against impunity must be a process that strengthens women survivors and their networks to demand rights and improve the quality of their lives in the camps. Since March 2019, Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) and the Liberation War Museum (LWM) have been conducting participatory action research with more than 80 women in the Rohingya Refugee Camps in Cox’s Bazaar, Bangladesh. Based on reflections of their life-stories, the women sew a panel to express their feelings, hopes, dreams, and memories. In May 2020, AJAR and LWM launched the online exhibition Quilt of Memory and Hope: Story of Rohingya Women Survivors sharing the stories from Rohingya women survivors told through the embroidered panels.

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, we believe our understanding of transitional justice should explore the relationship between human rights education and healing outcomes through digital technology, specifically through creative expression familiar to the community. The online quilt exhibition is one way to preserve, remember and share the stories of victims. This ability to hold these stories in a digital space is playing an increasingly pivotal role in preserving records for genocide prevention and education as well as the advancement of rights, including access to justice.

 

Digital Technology in Documenting Mass Atrocity Crimes: A Project to Implement

Sharjin Jahan, Kazi Taposhe Rabeya
Liberation War Museum

Ever since the sudden influx of Rohingya victims of Genocidal brutalities to Bangladesh the global community has acted in many different ways. While the Security Council has failed to react appropriately the process of justice and accountability has taken its own course. Both ICJ and ICC has taken up the case in their respective court. Ever since the sudden influx of Rohingya victims of Genocidal brutalities to Bangladesh the global community has acted in many different ways. While the Security Council has failed to react appropriately the process of justice and accountability has taken its own course. Both ICJ and ICC has taken up the case in their respective court. But the Covid-19 pandemic has changed the reality and many activities among and with the Rohingya community has come to a standstill. One the other hand digital platform and new technology has created new opportunities to address the issue of confronting ongoing genocide. New technology has to play more effective role in various aspects such as documentation of atrocity crimes and projecting the plight of the victims. Digital communication has opened new possibilities and international community must take advantage of that. The panelists will address the issue from various perspectives to enhance the role of new technology in confronting Genocide.