Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Tuesday, 20/July/2021
10:30am
-
11:00am
Reception
Location: lounge
11:00am
-
12:30pm
Session A2 1: Denialism in the Digital Age
Location: Room 1
Chair: Henry Theriault, International Association of Genocide Scholars, United States of America
 

Exploring new approaches to the study of genocide denialism: Towards a criminological network analysis of genocide denial

Roland Moerland

Maastricht University, Faculty of Law, Netherlands, The



Denying Genocides on Social Media; Considerations on avenues, impiedments, justifications, and politics. A case study of genocide denial against the genocide of the Tutsis of Rwanda on social media.

Freda, Kabami Kabatsi

Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya



Language and the Denial of Macedonian Ethnic Identity

Victor Bivell

Pollitecon Publications, Australia

Session A2 2: Asian Experiences
Location: Room 2
Chair: Simarjit Kaur, TARAN Peace building NGO, United Kingdom
 

Digital memory for a lasting peace: the “Khmer rouge history” app

Aude Brejon

Université Panthéon Assas, France



Genocide Recognition, Social Repair and Cultural Heritage in Cambodia

Rachel Killean1, Christoph Sperfeldt2

1: Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom; 2: University of Melbourne



“Identifying and Countering Holocaust Distortion. Lessons for Southeast Asia” – a case study of a digital exhibition

Natalia Sineaeva-Pankowska1,2

1: 'Never Again' Association, Poland; 2: GSSR, Poland



Representing Khmer Rouge violence in the digital age

Caroline Bennett

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Session A2 3: Advantages and Risks of Digital Technologies
Location: Room 3
Chair: Rosa Ana Alija, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
 

The use of geospatial technologies in Myanmar to document genocide

Elisenda Calvet Martinez

Universitat de Barcelona, Spain



Humanitarian technologies and ‘cyber-humanitarian interventions’

Rhiannon Neilsen

University of New South Wales, Australia



THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND RISKS FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GENOCIDE AND MASS KILLINGS

Narek Poghosyan

Comparative genocide department of the Armenian Genocide Museum-institute, Armenia

Session A2 4: Preventing Genocide and Responsibility to Protect
Location: Room 4
Chair: Timothy Williams, Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany
 

Eve of Disruption: The risk of atrocities in oil dependent states in a post-oil world

Sascha Nanlohy

University of Sydney, Australia



‘’Ethiopia’s hidden war in the Tigray region’’: Taking genocide alert seriously

Gebrehiwot Hadush Abera

KU Leuven, Belgium



The Role of the International Court of Justice for the Responsibility to Protect

Martin Mennecke

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark



Mass Atrocities in Myanmar, the Atrocity Gap and the Responsibility to Protect in a Digital Age

Camilla Buzzi

Østfold University College, Norway

 
12:30pm
-
1:00pm
Break
Location: lounge
1:00pm
-
2:30pm
Panel on Projections of War: Cinematic Representations of Bangladesh’s Independence
Location: Plenary room
Chair: Catherine Masud (University of Connecticut)
2:30pm
-
2:45pm
Short break
Location: lounge
2:45pm
-
4:00pm
Emerging Scholars Panel
Location: Plenary room
Chair: Timothy Williams, Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany
3:45pm
-
4:00pm
Break
Location: lounge
4:15pm
-
5:15pm
Keynote Alexa Koenig: Gender, Genocide and the Probative Power of Digital Information
Location: Plenary room
Chair: Elisenda Calvet Martinez, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
5:15pm
-
5:30pm
Break
Location: lounge
5:30pm
-
7:00pm
Session C2 1: Changing Ideologies and Identities in Genocide and Mass Atrocities
Location: Room 1
Chair: Erin Jessee, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
 

Changing Ideologies and Identities in Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Chair(s): Erin Jessee (University of Glasgow)

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

‘Ideology from nature’: exploring the role of biological images in the convergence of genocidal ideologies

Leah Owen
University of Oxford

 

Post-conflict resonance of identity claims: The case of Aceh, Indonesia

Lesley Daniels
Institut Barcelona d'Estudis Internacionals

 

Ideological and Identity Change in Theories of Genocide

Timothy Williams1, Jonathan Leader Maynard2
1Bundeswehr University Munich, 2King's College London

 

‘The Devil Makes Work:’ The Use of Conceptual Language of Evil in Genocide Analysis

Willa Rae Witherow-Culpepper
Rutgers University Newark

Session C2 2: Fieldwork Challenges of Genocide Studies Research: Cambodia, Rwanda and Rohingya Case Studies
Location: Room 2
Chair: Stephanie Wolfe, Weber State University, United States of America
 

Fieldwork Challenges of Genocide Studies Research: Cambodia, Rwanda and Rohingya Case Studies

Chair(s): Stephanie Wolfe (Weber State)

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

Practice, Positionality and Partnership: Reflections on Fieldwork in Cambodia

Rachel Killean
School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast

 

The Practicalities of Building a Flashlight: Fieldwork in Rwanda

Sara E. Brown
Center for Holocaust, Human Rights, and Genocide Education (Chhange)

 

Researching an Ongoing Genocide: Interviewing Rohingya Refugees

Melanie O'Brien
School of Law, University of Western Australia

Session C2 3: Genocide Denial and Its Consequences
Location: Room 3
Chair: Armen Marsoobian, International Association of Genocide Scholars, United States of America
 

Genocide Denial and Its Consequences

Chair(s): Armen T. Marsoobian (International Association of Genocide Scholars, United States of America)

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

A Regime of Epistemic Injustice: Turkey’s Three Pillars of Genocide Denialism

Imge Oranli
Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication Program, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts,Arizona State University

 

Genocide Denialism, Collective Misremembrance and Hermeneutical Oppression

Melanie Altanian
School of Philosophy, University College Dublin

 

Genocide Denial and Its Consequences for Victims and Perpetrators

Armen T. Marsoobian
Philosophy Department, Southern Connecticut State University

Session C2 4: The Future of Ethical and Inclusive Research Practices
Location: Room 4
Chair: Emily Sample, George Mason University, United States of America
 

The Future of Ethical and Inclusive Research Practices

Chair(s): Emily Sample (George Mason University, United States of America)

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

Pandemic Methodology: New directions in Research Collaboration

Emily Sample1, Lina Zedriga Waru Abuku2
1Raphaël Lemkin Genocide Prevention Program, George Mason University, United States of America, 2Regional Associations for Community Initiatives-Uganda

 

Taking a Feminist and Decolonized Ethnographic Approach to Research in Indonesia

Shelly Clay-Robison
George Mason University

 

Are We Listening? Preventing Future Genocides by Listening to Victims of the Past and Present

Kristina Hook
Better Evidence Project, George Mason University

 
7:00pm
-
7:30pm
Break
Location: lounge
7:30pm
-
9:00pm
Session D2 1: Intent in the Genocide Convention
Location: Room 1
Chair: Gregory Howard Stanton, Genocide Watch, United States of America
 

Intent in the Genocide Convention

Chair(s): Gregory Howard Stanton (Genocide Watch, United States of America)

 

Presentations of the Symposium

 

Schabas’s Singular Intent Theory – An Impossible Threshold of Genocidal Intent

Julia Sierra
Genocide Watch

 

"Ethnic cleansing" is a term for genocide denial.

Jennifer Kirby-McLemore
Genocide Watch

 

Distinguishing Myanmar’s genocide of the Rohingya from Croatia v Serbia

Giada Corsoni
Genocide Watch

 

Re-thinking State Intent

Vian Saggo
Genocide Watch

Session D2 2: Signals of Genocide
Location: Room 2
Chair: Carse Ramos, Rhode Island College, United States of America
 

Guide on Responding to Genocide

Murad Ismael, Alexia Anne-Charlotte Rauen

Sinjar Academy, United States of America



Where Does the River Start?: Structural Genocide Prevention and Local Conflict ‘Triggers’

Emily Sample

George Mason University, United States of America



THE ROLE OF MEDIA TECHNOLOGY IN GENOCIDE DENIAL: WHAT A DIFFERENCE 22 YEARS MAKES

Christi Ann Yoder

Center for Genocide Research and Education, United States of America



Internet Shutdowns: A Growing Mass Atrocity Risk

Rob Scharf

Auschwitz Institute for the Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities, United States of America

Session D2 3: Testimony of Genocide
Location: Room 3
Chair: Tawheed Reza Noor, Binghamton University, United States of America
 

The Continuation of Trauma through Transcribing: Generational Survivors and the Inability for a 'Post-Holocaust'

Sarah E Snyder

University of Texas at Dallas, United States of America



Teaching with Audio-Visual Testimonies of Survivors and Witness to Genocide

Kori Street

USC Shoah Foundation, United States of America



Survivor Memoirs – A Multi-faceted Source, A Less-employed Field of Inquiry for Genocide Studies

Rubina Peroomian

UCLA, United States of America



Perpetrators of sexual violence during the Bosnian Genocide and the Holocaust

Sandra Grudić

Clark University, United States of America

Session D2 4: Accountability and Deniability
Location: Room 4
Chair: Natalia Sineaeva-Pankowska, 'Never Again' Association, Poland
 

Faking Facts: The Case of FactCheckArmenia.com

Sarah Afaf Samwel

Carleton University, Canada



Genocide Knowledge and Epistemic Circle

Joachim J. Savelsberg

University of Minnesota, United States of America



DIGITAL IDENTIFICATION OF PERPETRATORS: THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF AVOIDING ACCOUNTABILITY FOR GENOCIDE

Daniel Rothenberg

Arizona State University, United States of America



Victimizers in documentary cinema. A possible taxonomy

Lior Zylberman

CONICET/CEG-UNTREF, Argentine Republic

Session D2 5: Indigenous Peoples' Caucus 1
Location: Room 5
Chair: Kerri Malloy, San José State University, United States of America