Conference Agenda

Topical Meetings and Sessions:

TOM 1 - Silicon Photonics and Guided-Wave Optics
TOM 2 - Computational, Adaptive and Freeform Optics
TOM 3 - Optical System Design, Tolerancing and Manufacturing
TOM 4 - Bio-Medical Optics
TOM 5 - Resonant Nanophotonics
TOM 6 - Optical Materials: crystals, thin films, organic molecules & polymers, syntheses, characterization and applications
TOM 7 - Thermal radiation and energy management
TOM 8 - Non-linear and Quantum Optics
TOM 9 - Opto-electronic Nanotechnologies and Complex Systems
TOM 10 - Frontiers in Optical Metrology
TOM 11 - Tapered optical fibers, from fundamental to applications
TOM 12 - Optofluidics
TOM 13 - Advances and Applications of Optics and Photonics
EU Project Session
Early Stage Researcher Session

More information on the Topical Meetings

Select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Select a single session for a detailed view (with abstracts and downloads when you are logged in as a registered attendee). The rest of the TOM sessions, EU project session, tutorials, and Early Stage Researcher session will be updated soon. Thank you for your patience!

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 5th Dec 2022, 05:07:25pm WET

 
 
Session Overview
Session
PLENARY SPEECH: Arno Rauschenbeutel
Time:
Thursday, 15/Sept/2022:
11:15am - 12:00pm

Session Chair: Sylvie Lebrun, Laboratoire Charles Fabry, France
Location: Auditorium

1st floor, next to registration desk, 400 seats

Professor at Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Title: Seeing A Single Atom Where It Is Not


Session Abstract

The precise determination of the position of sub-wavelength scale emitters and scatterers using far-field optical imaging techniques is of utmost importance for a wide range of applications in medicine, biology, astronomy, and physics. In this talk, I theoretically and experimentally show that, for a standard optical imaging system like an optical microscope, the image of an elliptically polarized point-like emitter does not coincide with the emitter's real position. Instead, even for perfect, aberration-free imaging with high numerical aperture, the image will in general be shifted. This can lead to a systematic error in the optical localization of emitters which exceeds the typical precision of super-localization microscopes by far. Moreover, for the case of small numerical aperture, the shift can in principle reach arbitrarily large values. Imaging a single trapped atom as well as a single gold nanoparticle, we experimentally demonstrate this effect and observe wavelength-scale shifts. Beyond its relevance for optical imaging, the demonstrated phenomenon may also occur for sources of other types of waves. Consequently, it can, e.g., impede the precision of the localization of remote objects with imaging radar and sonar as well as the future localization of stellar objects in gravitational wave astronomy.

 

More about the speaker

Arno Rauschenbeutel did his PhD in the group of Serge Haroche at ENS. He was Senior Scientist at the University of Bonn, Full Professor at the University of Mainz, and leader of the Applied Quantum Physics Group as well as Director of Atominstitut at TU Wien. Since 2018, he is an Alexander von Humboldt Professor and the leader of the Fundamentals of Optics and Photonics Group at HU Berlin. His research focuses on experimental quantum optics, nanophotonics, hybrid quantum systems, optical nanofibers, and optical microresonators. His group has pioneered the use of subwavelength-diameter optical fibers in quantum optical experiments. Arno Rauschenbeutel received a Marie Curie Excellence Award (EC), a European Young Investigators Award (ESF), a Lichtenberg-Professorship (VolkswagenFoundation), an ERC Consolidator Grant, and an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship (Alexander von Humboldt Foundation).


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