Conference Agenda

Topical Meetings and Sessions:

TOM 1 - Silicon Photonics and Guided-Wave Optics
TOM 2 - Computational, Adaptive and Freeform Optics
TOM 3 - Optical System Design, Tolerancing and Manufacturing
TOM 4 - Bio-Medical Optics
TOM 5 - Resonant Nanophotonics
TOM 6 - Optical Materials: crystals, thin films, organic molecules and polymers, syntheses, characterization and devices
TOM 7 - Thermal radiation and energy management
TOM 8 - Nonlinear and Quantum Optics
TOM 9 - Optics at Nanoscale (ONS)
TOM 10 - Optical Microsystems (OMS)
TOM 11 - Waves in Complex Photonic Media
TOM 12 - Optofluidics
TOM 13 - Ultrafast Optical Technologies and Applications
TOM 14 - Advances and Applications of Optics and Photonics
EU Project Session
Early Stage Researcher Session organised by SIOF
Grand Challenges of Photonics Session

More information on the Topical Meetings

Select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads when you are logged in as registered attendee). Plenary speeches, tutorials, and Early Researcher session will be updated very soon. Thank you for your patience!

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 27th June 2022, 08:11:27 CEST

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Plenary speech: Federico Capasso
Time:
Wednesday, 15/Sept/2021:
15:00 - 15:45

Location: Aula 1
1st floor

Federico Capasso

Professor

John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard University, Cambridge, USA

 

Federico Capasso is the Robert Wallace Professor of Applied Physics at Harvard University, which he joined in 2003 after 27 years at Bell Labs where his career advanced from postdoctoral fellow to Vice President for Physical Research. He pioneered bandgap engineering leading to many new heterostructure devices including the invention of the quantum cascade laser. He and his group did research on plasmonic and dielectric metasurfaces including the generalized laws of refraction and reflection, flat optics with focus on high performance metalenses and on new methods to generate structured light. He carried out fundamental studies of the Casimir effect including the first measurement of the repulsive Casimir force. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences . His awards include the 2021 Yves Medal and Jarus Quinn Prize of the Optical Society, the Balzan Prize for Applied Photonics, the King Faisal Prize, the American Physical Society Arthur Schawlow Prize, the IEEE Edison Medal, the Materials Research Society Medal, the Franklin Institute Wetherill Medal and the Enrico Fermi Prize. He holds honorary doctorates from Lund University, Diderot University and the University of Bologna.

 

Title: Meta-optics: From Flat Lenses to Cameras and Structured Light

Subwavelength spaced arrays of nanostructures, known as metasurfaces, provide a new basis for recasting optical components into thin planar elements, easy to optically align and control aberrations, leading to a major reduction in system complexity and footprint as well as theintroduction of new optical functions. The planarity of flat optics will lead to the unification of semiconductor manufacturing and lens making, where the planar technology to manufacture computer chips will be adapted to make CMOS compatible metasurface based optical components for high volume markets like cell phones. New polarization sensitive and depth cameras will be discussed. Metasurfaces also offer fresh opportunities for str ucturing light by wavefront engineering. I will discuss spin to total orbital angular momentum (OAM) converters and high OAM lasing, as well as flat devices that enable light’s spin and OAM to evolve, simultaneously, from one state to another along the propagation direction


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Presentations
ID: 553
Plenary talks

Meta-optics: from flat lenses to cameras and structured light

Federico Capasso

Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, United States of America

Subwavelength spaced arrays of nanostructures, known as metasurfaces, provide a new basis for

recasting optical components into thin planar elements, easy to optically align and control

aberrations, leading to a major reduction in system complexity and footprint as well as the

introduction of new optical functions. The planarity of flat optics will lead to the unification of

semiconductor manufacturing and lens making, where the planar technology to manufacture

computer chips will be adapted to make CMOS compatible metasurface based optical components

for high volume markets like cell phones. New polarization sensitive and depth cameras will be

discussed. Metasurfaces also offer fresh opportunities for structuring light by wavefront

engineering. I will discuss spin to total orbital angular momentum (OAM) converters and high

OAM lasing, as well as flat devices that enable light’s spin and OAM to evolve, simultaneously,

from one state to another along the propagation direction



 
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