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Sitzungsübersicht
Sitzung
Digital Day: Exemplarische Forschungsarbeiten aus der Wirtschaftsinformatik
Zeit:
Mittwoch, 18.03.2020:
9:00 - 10:30

Ort: Virtueller Raum 4

Prof. Dr. Alexander Benlian (TU Darmstadt): Sprint Zeal or Sprint Fatigue? The Benefits and Burdens of Agile ISD Practices Use for Developer Well-Being
Prof. Dr. Daniel Veit (Universität Augsburg): Adoption of Sustainable Technologies: A Mixed-Methods Study of German Households
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Stefan Morana (Universität des Saarlandes): Designing Process Guidance Systems


Zusammenfassung der Sitzung

Prof. Dr. Alexander Benlian (TU Darmstadt): Sprint Zeal or Sprint Fatigue? The Benefits and Burdens of Agile ISD Practices Use for Developer Well-Being

Despite the predominant view in the agile Information Systems Development (ISD) literature that agile ISD practices use (AISDPU) has positive ramifications for ISD teams and projects, previous research has largely neglected to study whether and how these practices are beneficial, or even burdensome, to individual developers. Whereas much of our knowledge on AISDPU and its consequences stems from cross-sectional studies and retrospective accounts, agile ISD practices are mainly used on a day-to-day basis and can thus be viewed as an inherently within-person phenomenon; this view points to the need for daily investigations that provide a closer examination of immediate, lived experiences. Integrating agile ISD literature with cognitive appraisal theory of stress and self-regulation theory, we develop the idea that daily AISDPU can have both energizing and depleting effects and may thus help or harm developer well-being. In an experience-sampling study of 131 developers who responded to daily surveys spread over 10 workdays, we show that AISDPU can indeed be a double-edged sword: instrumental to developers’ work engagement on some days yet detrimental to their self-regulation (by increasing depletion) on other days—two forces with countervailing effects on developer well-being. Importantly, we find that the divergent effects of AISDPU critically hinge on whether developers appraise it as a challenge or a threat. As a potential antidote, we investigate the moderating role of IT mindfulness in developers’ appraisal processes. Our results show that IT mindfulness serves as a facilitator of challenge appraisal and as a buffer against threat appraisal such that the potentially harmful downstream effects of AISDPU can be mitigated. On a broader note, this study challenges the prevailing assumption that AISDPU is a universally good thing and offers meaningful insights into why and when AISDPU improves versus impairs developer well-being.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Veit (Universität Augsburg): Adoption of Sustainable Technologies: A Mixed-Methods Study of German Households

Although technologies spurred by the “Internet of things” are increasingly being introduced in homes, only a few studies have examined the adoption or diffusion of such household technologies. One particular area of interest in this context is electricity consumption, especially the introduction of smart metering technology
(SMT) in households. Despite its growing prominence, SMT implementation has met with various challenges across the world, including limited adoption by consumers. Thus, this study empirically examines the antecedents of SMT adoption by potential consumers. Using a mixed-methods design, the study first unearths the SMT-specific antecedents, then develops a contextualized model by drawing on theories from motivational psychology and the antecedents identified earlier, and finally tests this model using a large-scale survey of German consumers. The results provide support for many of the hypotheses and highlight the importance of motivational factors and some household demographic, privacy, and innovation-related factors on consumers’ intention to adopt SMT.

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Stefan Morana (Universität des Saarlandes): Designing Process Guidance Systems

Process knowledge is a vital prerequisite for employees to execute organizational processes successfully in the course of their daily work. However, the lack of process knowledge, especially of novice users, and the need for support pose a challenge to employers. Inspired by research on spatial knowledge and navigation, we conceptualize three process knowledge types addressing the needs of employees during their process execution. On the basis of these process knowledge types, we derive three theoretically grounded design principles for process guidance systems to support employees’ process execution. We instantiate the design principles and evaluate the resulting artifacts in a laboratory experiment and in a subsequent field study. The results demonstrate the positive effects of process guidance systems on users’ process knowledge and process execution performance. Our study contributes to research and practice by proposing a new conceptualization of process knowledge and a nascent design theory for process guidance systems that builds on theories of spatial knowledge and navigation, as well as decision support research.




 
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